Composite of current and past nose art

Nose art isn’t just for humans

By Staff Sgt. Jarrod Chavana
Air Force Public Affairs Agency

Since the conception of war planes, Airmen have figured out ways to personalize these aircraft and make them their own. During World War I, the artwork focused on squadron pride. During World War II and beyond, these paintings became more intricate and personal. I would call some of them masterpieces because they reflect the creativity and craftsmanship of the pilots and aircrew who flew these aircraft. During World War II, some Airmen and artists would make additional money and boost morale by incorporating these murals onto the noses or bodies of aircraft.

I thought I would go through some of the Air Force’s archives and find some great examples and share them with you. I will say, some of the nose art from World War II and later could make our mothers blush.

 

Nose art called "Lets make a deal"
“Lets Make a Deal” nose art from a Boeing B-52G that flew in Operation Desert Storm is on display in the Cold War Gallery at the National Museum of the United States Air Force. (U.S. Air Force photo/Released)

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Tech. Sgt. April Howard, 20th Force Support Squadron Airman Leadership School instructor, points out discrepancies during the Airmen’'s first service dress inspection at Shaw Air Force Base, S.C. July 10, 2011. ALS is a five-week course designed to turn Airmen into supervisors and focuses on leadership and leadership duties. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Tabatha L. Duarte/Released)

ALS: “Airmen Locating Success”

By Senior Airman Michelle Patten
Air Force Public Affairs Agency

Airman Leadership School can be viewed a few different ways. For some it is just another box to check in order to be able to wear their staff sergeant stripes. Others see ALS as the transition from Airman to non-commissioned officer. Another group of Airmen are just glad to have a break from the daily grind of their regular missions.

Tech. Sgt. Jamie Kienholz, non-commissioned officer in charge at Joint Base San Antonio Airman Leadership School, talks to Airmen from ALS Class 15-3 during the Introduction to Negotiation lecture at Joint Base San Antonio-Lackland, Texas, March 19, 2015. Kienholz has served as NCOIC for the past year and says the change to the developmental special duty process has brought sharp and motivated NCOs to the schoolhouse. (U.S. Air Force photo by Tech. Sgt. Joshua Strang/Released)
Tech. Sgt. Jamie Kienholz, non-commissioned officer in charge at Joint Base San Antonio Airman Leadership School, talks to Airmen from ALS Class 15-3 during the Introduction to Negotiation lecture at Joint Base San Antonio-Lackland, Texas, March 19, 2015. Kienholz has served as NCOIC for the past year and says the change to the developmental special duty process has brought sharp and motivated NCOs to the schoolhouse. (U.S. Air Force photo by Tech. Sgt. Joshua Strang/Released)

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Staff Sgt. Eddie Glover, insures that a flight of basic trainees are properly aligned in formation at the 322nd Training Squadron April 17, at Joint Base San Antonio-Lackland. Staff Sgt. Glover was named the 2014 Military Training Instructor of the Year.  (U.S. Air Force photo by Benjamin Faske/Released)

Adventure to Lackland: Another Day in Paradise

By Senior Airman Soo C. Kim
Air Force Public Affairs Agency

Editor’s note: This is part two of a series detailing this author’s experiences at Air Force Basic Military Training and beyond. You can read part one of the series here.

A week and some days have passed since the fateful night we met our campaign-hat-of-doom. Most of us were still shivered at the sight of anything that remotely resembled that hat as if the Grim Reaper himself was staring directly into our soul. But, as the days went by, we slowly adapted to our new lifestyle.

Marching everywhere and avoiding eye contact with anyone who had more than two stripes became the norm. The yelling and push-ups began to sound and feel like loud sage advice and an opportunity to make my less-than-impressive “guns” stronger.
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What personal readiness means to me

By Tech. Sgt. Steve Grever
Air Force Public Affairs Agency

One of the biggest challenges facing the Air Force today is maintaining operational readiness and warfighting capabilities to meet the requirements of combatant commanders. The statement above includes many “strategic” words we hear from leadership at commander’s calls and other events, but they should impact every Airman wearing the uniform. All of us are work to accomplish the mission daily, which ensures the Air Force is ready to fight and win the nation’s wars.

Air Force senior leaders have the daunting task of getting us the right equipment and resources to meet and exceed the nation’s expectations. But, as Airmen, we are responsible for getting our personal readiness aligned with our leader’s strategies and vision for the future.

For me, personal readiness encompasses performing my job to the best of my ability and making sure my family and other aspects of my personal life are in order so I’m always ready to deploy or go on temporary duty assignments. This can be a difficult if you try to tackle it all at once, but I’ve found that breaking it down into groups of smaller tasks has helped me more easily manage work and family issues. When you have a plan to sync up your Air Force and personal responsibilities, it will help you reach your goal of attaining personal readiness that’s good for you, your family, the Air Force and the nation.

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