Aviation history comes alive at Night at the Air Force Museum

Below is some information provided by Sarah Parke of the National Museum of the United States Air Force about a great event coming up at the museum.

Here’s an event that appeals to aviation enthusiasts of all ages.

Ever wondered what happens in the galleries of the National Museum of the United States Air Force after the doors close each evening? Now you can experience a “Night at the Air Force Museum” during a new event that takes place from 6-10 p.m. on Friday, May 15.

The museum will host a variety of interactive programs, giving you a unique opportunity to see aviation history come alive and discover the source behind this evening of “life” at the museum. Best of all, this
family-friendly event is free!

You’ll meet characters from all eras of military aviation history, from a World War I flyboy to an Apollo astronaut. In addition, you can attempt to fly a Wright B simulator, get your face adorned with camouflage paint, write a postcard to the troops and look into seven aircraft cockpits (B-24D, P-61C, RF-86F, UH-19B, F-22A, SR-71 and AC-130A).

Free IMAX films and Morphis MovieRides also will be offered. During the film “Flyers,” showing at 7 p.m., a World War II fighter pilot teaches his young protégé the true meaning of flight. At 8:30 p.m., “Destiny in Space” will give the audience an inspiring look at the challenges future generations will face in exploring the universe. Seating for the IMAX films is available on a first-come, first-served basis.

The museum’s gift shop and café will be open for business during the event.

Night at the Air Force Museum coincides with the spring release of the “Night at the Museum 2: Battle of the Smithsonian” movie.

The National Museum of the United States Air Force is located near Dayton, Ohio. Additional details about the event are available at www.nationalmuseum.af.mil/night.asp. Groups of 10 or more are encouraged to pre-register on the Web site.

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