About admin


Website:
admin has written 11 articles so far, you can find them below.


Blog Spotlight: Daily Gingerbread

*Occasionally, Air Force Live puts the spotlight on individual blogs written by Airmen or their family members. These blogs provide an unofficial glimpse into the various aspects of Air Force life. Opinions expressed are those of the bloggers and are not endorsed by the US Air Force.

Staff Sgt. Sarah Brown in Afghanistan

Even though she’s a writer by trade, Staff Sgt. Sarah Brown has found that some things are best said through pictures.

That’s why she posts a mix of photos and articles on her personal blog, Daily Gingerbread, about her second deployment to Afghanistan. She’s currently serving as a Public Affairs Airman for the NATO Training Mission Afghanistan.

On the blog, she records her life in Kabul, sharing her experiences with the Afghan people in a war environment while supporting NATO forces as they train the Afghan military.

“This is a land of vast differences,” she wrote recently. “Rugged terrain and tenuous beauty, all surrounding a fragile hope for the future. We came to make it a better palce for the people who live here, to give them a sense of the world around them and let them know that there is more to life than just survival, that with hard work and determination (and maybe a bit of luck) anything is truly possible.”

To follow Sergeant Brown’s deployment, visit Daily Gingerbread.

16855_1341873990628_1344565024_2500882_6091851_n

30911_1460852285011_1344565024_2770054_6927814_n

16855_1342499966277_1344565024_2502267_2743950_n

Airman trains with Marines

MarineCorpSeal255

An Airman fell in with the Marine Corps recently.

Master Sgt. David Wolfe, a security forces Airman from Scott Air Force Base, Ill., is training at the Marine Corps Staff NCO Academy at Camp Pendleton in southern California. He volunteered for it after learning slots were available for Air Force senior NCOs.

“I knew this would be a challenge and the opportunity to work with the Marine Corps for seven weeks sounded like an awesome chance to grow personally and professionally,” said Sergeant Wolfe, who enlisted in the Air Force in 1992 and has served all over the world, to include the Middle East, Germany, Italy, Alaska and Wyoming. “My wife did three years in the Marine Corps and my oldest son enlisted last summer just after I left for Iraq, and is currently in tech school, so we have some family connection to the Corps as well.”

Sergeant Wolfe shared his first week experience with Air Force Live.

Week One

As our military continues to fight and train as a joint team, opportunities to gain experience working with different services grow. Training here at the Staff NCO Academy at Camp Pendleton, California is one of those chances that may only surface once in a career. That’s where I have been since leaving my job in the 375th Security Forces Squadron at Scott AFB, Illinois April 28th – attending the Marine Corps’s equivalent of the AFSNCOA with 103 United States Marine Gunnery Sergeants, and one Sergeant Major from the Taiwanese Marine Corps.

When I arrived, I had little idea what to expect, and was greeted by my roommate who just happens to be from my hometown of Grand Rapids, Michigan. Gunnery Sergeant Dan Raterink, a 13 year E-7 stationed at Kaneohe Bay, Hawaii has been keeping me in line and on track from the start.

The biggest difference so far, expectedly, is the frequency and intensity of the physical training program. PT is conducted five days per week, and it’s tough! We began by taking the Marine Corps physical fitness test on day one, a test that was recorded in the permanent personnel folder of each Marine. Everyone passed, and my roommate scored 290 out of 300, one of the highest in the class. I knew then I was not going to be permitted any slacking off in the PT department. Our schedule calls for 32 PT sessions in a 35 training day schedule.

The academics thus far have been largely similar to what we teach in our PME, with the obvious exception of the lingo barrier. Some common phrases used by the Marines are foreign to me, but everyone understands and is doing their best to keep me informed if start to look a little lost.

One interesting and motivating item I have enjoyed is the acceptance of yelling under what some might deem inappropriate circumstances. In the Air Force, we sometimes adopt the Army term “HUA” for a motivating yell or even a greeting, and of course the Marines use a different “OORAH” for the same basic purposes. However, the use of barking, grunting, or any other loud yell seems totally acceptable at any time to express ones acceptance of an order or instruction. They say I’ll be doing it too before long and I think they could be right!

Several homework assignments are taking up the first full weekend here in sunny southern California, and we are working together as a team to get done our mission requirements. My roommate asked me to attend some PT sessions with him after duty hours as well, and I have been. With 14 work outs in just 10 days, and the concentration on nutrition, I think seeing some progress in the fit of my clothing is a good possibility.

Being here with some of the finest men and women our country has to offer has been a true blessing and I am looking forward to the next five weeks.

Until next week, “OORAH” from Camp Pendleton.

Warrior Games Off to Great Start

 

Staff Sgt. Richard Pollock II moves into his wheelchair as he prepares to practice basketball May 10, 2010, at the Olympic Training Center in Colorado Springs, Colo. Sergeant Pollock is a member of the Air Force wheelchair basketball team. Teams from the Air Force, Army, Navy, Marines and Coast Guard are participating in the inaugural Warrior Games which begin May 10 and finish May 14. (U.S. Air Force photo/Staff Sgt. Desiree N. Palacios)

Staff Sgt. Richard Pollock II moves into his wheelchair as he prepares to practice basketball May 10, 2010, at the Olympic Training Center in Colorado Springs, Colo. Sergeant Pollock is a member of the Air Force wheelchair basketball team. Teams from the Air Force, Army, Navy, Marines and Coast Guard are participating in the inaugural Warrior Games which begin May 10 and finish May 14. (U.S. Air Force photo/Staff Sgt. Desiree N. Palacios)

The Warrior Games are off to a great start, thanks to participation from Airmen such as Staff Sgt. Richard Pollock II.

In an article written by Staff Sgt. Vanessa Young of Defense Media Agency-San Antonio, Sergeant Pollock describes how he went from being a severely injured individual to the highly-competive lived in the gym as a competitive body builder, a lean 235 pounds with only 10 percent body fat. In August 2008, Sergeant Pollock was on his way to work on his motorcycle when he collided with a car that ran through a stop sign. He was traveling 55 miles per hour and upon impact, flew 97 feet from his bike. Everything below his waist – his pelvis, knees, legs and feet – was broken. He was in a coma for three weeks, and was treated in six different hospitals in six months. All of his broken bones were rebuilt with metal.

Yet the sergeant is back in the game, literally. He’s competing in events such as wheelchair basketball, shot put and discus.

You can read more about him HERE.

Warrior Games Open

WarriorGamesThe Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff wrote on his official blog, and recorded a video, about the incredible spirit he’s witnessed at the Warrior Games, a joint effort between the U.S. Olympic Committee and the Department of Defense. The Warrior Games are played by injured servicemembers who have all overcome their injuries to excel at a variety of sports. You can read more about his views and the Warrior Games HERE.

Visit DoD Live for updates all week.

Superpowers unite!

When superpowers unite, good things happen.

IronMan

Photo is © 2010 MVLFFLLC. TM & © 2010 Marvel. All Rights Reserved.

For the “Iron Man 2” film, Marvel chose to incorporate the War Machine and the character of Air Force Lt Col Rhodes, played by Don Cheadle.  Because of this, we were presented with a unique opportunity to carry over the Air Force markings on the War Machine from the storyline on the screen to the marketing of the film on their Website. 

Just like in the film, we were able to place the Air Force logo on War Machine (as well as the AFMC patch, the text “AF 47″ and the old Air Force heritage logo), and extend the USAF markings into the marketing of the film through the official film’s website. 

The Marvel creative team also linked the Air Force Recruiting Website,  www.airforce.com, as the rollover on the Air Force logo on War Machine. So, when you enter the site (http://ironmanmovie.marvel.com), you have two options for backgrounds to choose from. Iron Man or War Machine.

Clicking different tabs (Videos, Extras, About the film, etc) gives a new point of view on the uniform. If you click the Videos tab, once the background rotates, you will see the Air Force logo has a flashing blue circle rollover. If you click that, a tab that says “U.S. Air Force” comes out with a link to the www.airforce.com.

IronMan2

Photo is © 2010 MVLFFLLC. TM & © 2010 Marvel. All Rights Reserved.

With Marvel adding the www.airforce.com link voluntarily, it speaks volumes to the awesome partnership the Air Force has with Marvel. This is a first for the Air Force where the branding of the Air Force logo in a  film has been carried over to the marketing of the film and incorporated with a link to the Air Force Recruiting Web site!

Iron Man 2 opens on Friday, May 7.

Photo Credits: Francois Duhamel/Marvel

Page 1 of 3123»