Tag Archives: Air Force Recruiting Service

AFRS participates in first tweetchat

Carissa PictureThe Air Force Recruiting Service participated in its  first tweetchat June 6 and received more than 100 recruitment questions from online participants. During the hour-long Web event, AFRS officials answered questions about enlistment eligibility requirements, Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery test scores and other career field-specific questions. The first 15 questions were answered during the tweetchat and are available here. The rest of the unanswered questions are below. AFRS will host monthly tweetchats showcasing Airmen from different career fields who will share their Air Force experiences.  

PHOTO: Carissa, Air Force Recruiting Service online advisor

Q16: Can I still try out for Pararescue even though I wear glasses?
A16: Yes, but you must meet all physical and ASVAB requirements and the physical ability and stamina test (PAST). Vision requirements for Pararescue include passing a color vision test, having uncorrected vision 20/70-20/200, corrected vision or 20/20 vision each eye.

Q17: Could I join the Air Guard on top of ROTC if I don’t get a four-year scholarship and then transfer to active duty upon commission?
A17: For Air Guard information, you may contact the Air National Guard on their website. They have a live chat capability to answer your questions: http://www.goang.com.

Q18: Can you join with type 2 diabetes?
A18: Unfortunately, this is a potentially medically disqualifying condition. However, the doctor at the Military Entrance Processing Station  (MEPS) will make that determination. Your local recruiter can have your medical records for this condition prescreened by the doctor at the MEPS for you to find a preliminary ruling in your particular situation.

Q19: In regards to the Health Professions Scholarship Program, do Air Force physicians choose their specialty or does the Air Force assign a specialty based off of their need?
A19: Physicians can list three specialties and the specialty may be determined by the needs of the Air Force. You can find all of our health profession job descriptions here: http://www.airforce.com/careers/#education:healthcare-professional.

Q20: Will a professional pilot’s degree with a commercial rating and several hundred flight hours give me a leg up for a pilot’s slot?
A20: Here are the general requirements to be a pilot:

  • Be a U.S. citizen
  • 4-year college degree
  • At least a 2.5 GPA
  • Must meet the selection board before age 28
  • Between 5’4″ and 6’5″ in height
  • Distance vision no worse than 20/70, correctable to 20/20
  • Near vision 20/20, uncorrected.

There are many possible paths you can take in pursuit of earning your wings. You could choose to get your degree on your own and apply for your commission following graduation. Or, you could choose to come on to active duty and let the Air Force pay up to 100 percent of your college tuition.You could gain valuable Air Force experience while getting your degree. Once you have obtained your degree, apply for your commission and select to become a pilot. Having earned your private pilot’s license will increase your chances of being selected, as well as earning a technical college degree, though you may apply with most any type of degree.

Q21: Is it likely for a girl to be able to go to Airborne School?
A21: Airborne is an Army Military Occupational Skill (MOS). The Army runs the Airborne School and the Air Force does not have this job. However, Battlefield
Airmen (males only) attend Airborne School. There has been no official Office of the Secretary of Defense (OSD) announcement of any change in policy to allow women in combat positions. As soon as we learn more details, we will provide them.

Q22: I will be graduating my junior college with around 62 credits. Will that help out at all when trying to enlist?
A22: Advanced rank can be earned through many different channels for your accomplishments before entering the Air Force.
College Credits (Qualifying):
– 20 semester or 30 quarter hours = E-2
– 45 semester or 67 quarter hours = E-3
You will need to provide official college transcripts to verify the amount of college credits you have earned.

Q23: What is the best way to become a helicopter pilot in the Air Force?
A23: Here are the general requirements to be a pilot:

  • Be a U.S. citizen
  • 4-year college degree
  • At least a 2.5 GPA
  • Must meet the selection board before age 28
  • Between 5’4″ and 6’5″ in height
  • Distance vision no worse than 20/70, correctable to 20/20
  • Near vision 20/20, uncorrected.

There are many possible paths you can take in pursuit of earning your wings. You could choose to get your degree on your own and apply for your commission following graduation. Or, you could choose to come on to active duty and let the Air Force pay up to 100 percent of your college tuition.You could gain valuable Air Force experience while getting your degree. Once you have obtained your degree, apply for your commission and select to become a pilot. Having earned your private pilot’s license will increase your chances of being selected, as well as earning a technical college degree, though you may apply with most any type of degree.

Q24: How long would it take an enlisted airman to work up to an officer after their BMT and starting tech school?
A24: If you are active duty United States Air Force and inquiring about a commission, applying to Officers Training School, your point of contact is your Base Education Office. The Base Education Office is responsible for the application process and will answer any inquiries pertaining to this process. If you are not active Air Force, the length it may take you to earn your college degree depends on how motivated you are toward earning your degree in your off duty time.

Q25: I’m interested in security forces. What are the qualifications? Requirements?
A25: You must meet the requirements to enlist in the US Air Force, to include qualifying on the Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery (ASVAB), and passing a physical examination. You must have a minimum of a 33 in the General Aptitude Area of your ASVAB test. It is mandatory that you have a valid driver’s license.

Q26: What’s the best way to get in touch with someone to talk about OTS if there aren’t any offices nearby?
A26: You will need to contact your nearest active duty Air Force recruiter and ask to speak to an officer accessions recruiter. http://www.airforce.com/contact-us/recruiter-locator. Or you can visit the OTS website. http://www.au.af.mil/au/holmcenter/OTS/index.asp.

Q27: I was DQ’ed for asthma a few months back. Is there any chance of being able to reapply? Do the MEPS stations ever drop files?
A27: Asthma, including reactive airway disease, exercise-induced bronchospasm or asthmatic bronchitis, reliably diagnosed at any age, is disqualifying. However, you are disqualified after your 13th birthday if any evidence of it still exists. The doctor at the Military Entrance Processing Station (MEPS) will make the determination of whether or not your situation is disqualifying. Your local recruiter can have your medical records for this condition prescreened by the doctor at MEPS for you to find a preliminary ruling. Yes, the MEPS does drop/delete files.

Q28: With fewer slots available today, what are the minimum requirements for enlisting?
A28: To quality for the Air Force, you must:

  • Be a U.S. citizen or have a valid unrestricted alien registration card from the USCIS with at least two years remaining until expiration. (You must obtain this status on your own, the Air Force cannot assist you with obtaining it.)
  • You cannot be a conscientious objector. A conscientious objector is an individual who has claimed the right to refuse to perform military service on the grounds of freedom of thought, conscience, or religion.
  • Any law violations will need to be evaluated.
  • Any use of illegal drugs or misuse of prescription medication will need to be evaluated.
  • You will have a credit check run looking for delinquencies and overbalanced credit.
  • Be between the ages of 17-27. If 17 you will need parental consent.
  • Be of good health all medical issues will need to be evaluated. Meet our height and weight requirements.
  • To enlist, be a high school graduate, junior or senior.
  • To be an officer, be a college graduate or a senior.
  • The Air Force allows you to be single with no dependents, married to a military member with no dependents, or married to a civilian with one dependent upon entry to enlistment.
  • You will need to have a Social Security Card.

Q29: What jobs are typically in demand right now?
A29: The job you train and serve in is dependent upon your successful qualifying in the United States Air Force. Jobs in demand are ever-changing, and are based upon the needs of the Air Force.

Q30: I went Palace Chase a few years ago. I was in four years. Can I go back AD after I graduate from dental hygiene school as a 4yh?
A30: You must meet the requirements for the Air Force Prior Service Program. If you have been out of the military for six years or longer, you will not qualify to reenter the US Air Force. Prior Service vacancies are based upon the Air Force Special Code (AFSC), and the total number of years you have served in that particular job. Jobs are based upon your successful qualifying to reenter the Air Force, and the needs of the Air Force.

Q31: After attending the Academy, what continued medical educational opportunities you offer?
A31: Those individuals who are graduating from the Air Force Academy and are continuing education or pursuing higher education in the Health Professions area, may apply for the Air Force’s Health Professions Scholarship Program (HPSP), or depending upon the type of degree, may apply through the Air Force Institute of Technology (AFIT).

Q32: What are the height and weight requirements to be a pilot?
A32: Height requirements for pilots:
– Standing must be between 64 and 77 inches
– Sitting must be between 33 and 40 inches

Q33: Do Airmen receive vacation time?
A33: Active Duty Air Force members earn 2.5 days per month or 30 days of vacation each year.

Q34: If you get injured in Basic Military Training, what happens?
A34: If you become injured while in Basic Military Training, you will be referred to a doctor(s) who will make a medical eligibility determination to continue training or separate, depending upon the severity of the injury.

Q35: Can you join the Air Force with a peanut allergy? Can you be a pilot?
A35: Peanut allergies are medically disqualifying, and would not be eligible to pursue Pilot Training.

Q36: What heart conditions, confirmed or suspected, exclude someone from joining the Air Force?
A36: Unfortunately, heart conditions are a potentially medically disqualifying condition. However, the doctor at the Military Entrance Processing Station (MEPS) will make that determination. Your local recruiter can have your medical records for this condition prescreened by the doctor at the MEPS for you to find a preliminary ruling in your particular situation.

Q37: How much physical preparation is needed before MEPS?
A37: There is no preparation to take the Air Force entrance physical examination.

Q38: What jobs are open to a Security Forces Specialist after time in the Air Force? What educational degrees are helpful?
A38: Individuals who have been trained in Security Forces in the Air Force, most always qualify as a Peace Officer, Law Enforcement in the civilian sector. With a degree earned while serving in the Air Force, you may qualify to apply for most all federal law enforcement jobs. A degree(s) earned in Criminal Justice is helpful.

Q39: What are the steps needed to become a fighter pilot? What are the requirements?
A39: Here’s what it takes to become an Air Force Pilot:

  • U.S. citizen
  • Any four-year college degree
  • Must meet the selection board before age 28
  • Be between 64 and 77 inches in height
  • Distance vision no worse than 20/70, correctable to 20/20
  • Near vision 20/20, uncorrected, color vision is required.

Path to a Pilot seat:
Once you are qualified to join the Air Force as a commissioned officer you will take this path to get your wings.
1.) Complete Officer Training ( AF Academy, AF ROTC, OTS)
2.) Enter Undergraduate Pilot Training (UPT) and begin your flight training. (one year)
3.) Nearing completion of UPT you will be assigned an aircraft. It’s called getting your Seat Assignment. This is determined by these factors: class ranking, training performance reports, instructor recommendations, your aircraft preferences, and our needs.
4.) Upon completion of UPT and your seat assignment, you continue your flight training for the specific aircraft you were assigned. (six months to one year)
5.) Nearing completion of your Advanced Flight Training, you will be given a squadron and location assignment. Your location preferences are considered.
6.) The commitment for an Air Force pilot is 10 years of active duty service after completion of pilot training.

This website offers excellent information regarding pilot testing, selection, training and lifestyle: http://www.baseops.net/militarypilot.

Q40: As a CSO, can you choose a specific aircraft?
A40: The type of aircraft a Combat System Officer is rated in is determined by academic achievement(s), commander/supervisor recommendation, and the needs of the Air Force.

Q41: Can I enter the Air Force with increased rank if I am in Civil Air Patrol?
A41: Yes, if you have earned the Billy Mitchell, Amelia Earhart or Carl Spaatz award, you may qualify with advanced rank of E-3.

Q42: I am a junior in college, should I wait until I graduate to join the AF? Should I enlist and try to become an officer later?
A42: The decision and time to join the U.S. Air Force is yours to make. If you are a junior in college and progressing toward a Bachelor’s Degree, once you have earned it, it may qualify you to apply for Officers Training School. Should you decide to quit college and complete your education while enlisted and serving in the Air Force, college credits you have earned may qualify you for advanced rank up to E-3. Your Air Force recruiter will discuss qualifying, options, and opportunities with you.

Q43: What is it like to be a Pararescue Jumper?
A43: Are you willing to do whatever it takes to save a person’s life? To parachute, scuba dive, rock climb or even snowmobile into hostile territory to get to a wounded Airman who needs your help? Then you may be ready to be a Pararescue specialist. You’ll be trained in emergency medical tactics, as well as in combat and survival skills so you can go anywhere necessary. You’ll train extensively and be on alert 24 hours a day, because when the call comes, it will be up to you to answer it.

Q44: What are the standard ASVAB requisites and training for Security Operations Specialists?
A44: The score required for Security Forces is General 33; based on Air Force requirements, the minimum Armed Forces Qualifications Test (AFQT) score required for entry on the Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery (ASVAB) is 36. However, due to the high number of individuals who are qualified and waiting to depart for Basic Military Training (over 90 percent of them possessing an ASVAB score over 50 percentile) your recruiter may not be able to process you and may ask you to return when they have space on their waiting list to add new applicants. So study hard and good luck!

Q45: Does it matter what field of study your bachelor’s degree is in for OTS?
A45: No, it does not. You may apply for OTS with most any type of college degree. To be eligible to apply for Officer Training School, one must have a baccalaureate degree or be a senior at a college or university that is accredited by one of the six regional accreditation commissions recognized by the U.S. Dept. of Education. Applicants who have graduated from a non- accredited college or university in the United States or from another country may apply. However, they must present evidence from an accredited institution of higher learning that their credits are acceptable for graduate work. You must have earned a GPA of 3.0 or better to be eligible to apply.

Q46: What is the probability of a female becoming a top-ranked sniper?
A46: It is possible as females are a part of Security Forces. You could apply after two years as a Security Forces member to be a part of the close precision engagement (sniper) team.

Q47: I was medically separated in March. Do I need to wait six months to reenlist or can I do it sooner?
A47: Yes you must wait six months before reapplying to join the Air Force. Make sure you keep all of your paperwork, and the reason for being medically separated no longer exists.

Q48: What is the outlook for flight training candidates needed in the next few years?
A48: The Air Force accepts applications for Officer Training School (OTS), and pilot training from highly qualified applicants for scheduled selection boards throughout the year. Selection boards meet to select candidates, based on the needs of the Air Force.

Q49: How big a demand is there for accounting and business majors in the AF?
A49: The OTS selection board selects the best qualified applicants to become Air Force officers. A board of senior Air Force officers at Headquarters Air Force Recruiting Service will review your application. Selection is competitive and based on your desires, qualifications (such as aeronautical ratings, type of bachelors or master’s degree, or civilian or military specialty skills), and specific Air Force manpower needs. Each applicant is evaluated for character, academic accomplishments, community service, and leadership potential. As part of the selection process, board members review both objective and subjective factors. Objectively, the board considers each applicants academic discipline, and AFOQT scores. Subjectively, board members evaluated work experience, accomplishments, adaptability, character, leadership ability, potential for future growth, and other recommendations. For active duty enlisted members, performance reports and commanders recommendations are also evaluated. A minimum of three Air Force colonels reviews every application. The selection process is similar to an Air Force Officer Promotion Board. Key to the entire process is that no single factor leads to an individual’s selection. Boards meet to select candidates, based on the needs of the Air Force.

Q50: I want to go in as an officer in International Affairs? What is your best advice for jobs associated in that specialty?
A50: There isn’t an International Affairs career field, but Public Affairs officer would be close. Here is a link of our officer careers: http://www.airforce.com/careers/#education:college-graduate

Q51: Are actual manned aircraft being replaced by unmanned drones in the near future? Do we use drones for anything other than military missions?
A51: There is the possibility of unmanned aircraft in the future. Drones can be used for many different purposes like visual check of an area after a natural disaster and patrolling U.S. borders. The use of drones or Remotely Piloted Aircraft contribute to our aircraft inventory and successful mission accomplishments

Q52: Can you go to airborne school if you are Air Force Reserve?
A52: Airborne is an Army Military Occupational Skill (MOS), and training is provided by the U.S. Army. You may contact the Air Force Reserve, a Reserve component of the U.S. Air Force, on their website. The Air Force Reserve has a Live Chat to answer your questions. http://www.afreserve.com

Q53: Is it difficult to get into the ROTC program?
A53: Air Force ROTC is a highly competitive program that leads to commissioning as an officer in the U.S. Air Force following graduation from college. For further assistance, you may contact Air Force ROTC on their website for more information. http://www.afrotc.com

Q54: Does the AF Reserve offer TACP as a career field?
A54: Yes, the Air Force Reserve offer Tactical Air Command and Control as a career selection provided you meet the requirements. You may contact the Air Force Reserve, a Reserve component of the U.S. Air Force, on their website. The Air Force Reserve has a Live Chat to answer your questions. http://www.afreserve.com

Q55: How difficult is it to switch from AF Reserve to active duty?
A55: It will depend upon your qualifications and what jobs the active duty Air Force is looking for. You would fall under the Prior Service program. The Prior Service (PS) program is an enlistment program allowing a select number of separated individuals to return to active duty. The program will access a total of 250 applicants during FY13. The total accession is subject to change based on Air Force needs and is separated into three categories: Category I – Direct Duty (DD): return without consideration of years of service (YOS) and Category II – DD: YOS restriction. Category III – Retraining. Your Air Force Recruiter has a listing of jobs which we are currently looking for, based on the job you are qualified in, years of service, and your successful qualifying. Applicant must not have a break in service exceeding six years. Applicant must have performed duties in the requested return AFSC during their last term of enlistment. An Air Force Recruiter will determine if an eligibility determination is required, to permit you to enlist. Please contact a recruiter nearest you for details. The prior service program is open at this time, and positions are filled based upon the needs of the U.S. Air Force. http://www.airforce.com/contact-us/recruiter-locator

Q56: Is loadmaster a high-demand job?
A56: This Air Force no longer offers Loadmaster as a job. This job has been incorporated into the Special Missions Aviation Apprentice (1A931). This job, just as the loadmaster, is a highly demanding, yet rewarding job. Contact your Air Force recruiter to discuss qualifying, options, and opportunities.

Q57: What are the jobs that are in high demand?
A57: Our Special Operation careers are always in high demand as well as cryptologic linguist.

Q58: Are there jobs that include signing bonuses?
A58: Yes, currently they are:

  • A8X1 AIRBORNE LINGUIST $11,000
  • 1N3XX CRYPTO LINGUIST $11,000
  • 1C2X1 COMBAT CONTROLLERS $15,000
  • 1T2X1 PARARESCUE – $15,000
  • 1C4X1 TACP – $14,000
  • 1T0X1 SERE – $13,000
  • 3E8X1 EOD – $13,000
  • 3P0X1 SECURITY FORCES – $1,500
  • 1W0X2 SPEC. OPS. WEATHER – $13,000

Keep in mind that these bonuses can change based on the needs of the Air Force.

Q59: What is the process to becoming a Special Operations TACP?
A59: You will schedule an appointment with a recruiter and start the process of ASVAB testing and completing a medical exam. Your ASVAB and your medical exam determine your job qualifications. After you have completed processing, you will then be schedule by your recruiter to take the TACP Physical Ability Stamina Test (PAST) to see if you can qualify for that career.

Q60: Does the AF Reserve offer engineering jobs?
A60: Yes, the U.S. Air Force Reserve offers engineering jobs. You may contact the Air Force Reserve, a Reserve component of the U.S. Air Force, on their website. The Air Force Reserve has a Live Chat to answer your questions at http://www.afreserve.com

Q61: Can graduates with degrees in English Literature join as officers, or do you need a science/math-related degree?
A61: Yes you may apply for Officers Training School (OTS) with most any type of college degree. To be eligible to apply for Officer Training School, one must have a baccalaureate degree or be a senior at a college or university that is accredited by one of the 6 regional accreditation commissions recognized by the US Dept. of Education. Applicants who have graduated from a non- accredited college or university in the United States or from another country may apply. However, they must present evidence from an accredited institution of higher learning that their credits are acceptable for graduate work. You must have earned a GPA of 3.0 or better to be eligible to apply.

Q62: Does the AF still offer tuition assistance?
A62: Yes we do still offer the tuition assistance program. Tuition Assistance is a program that the Air Force uses to pay 100% of the tuition cost for college classes that you take in your off-duty time. This is not a loan, and is at no cost to the Air Force member. Using the tuition assistance program will not have any effect on the availability of the Post 9-11 GI Bill funds.

Q63: Does previous flight experience give you a better chance at becoming a pilot?
A63: Along with meeting requirements to apply for Officers Training School (OTS), and pilot training, earning a technical degree and a private pilot’s license will increase your chances of being selected.

Mountains

 By Senior Master Sgt. Kathleen McCool
Air Force Recruiting Service

While on an aircraft recently my seven-year-old son pointed out the window and asked me what was below. As I replied “mountains” he got a strange look on his face and said “that’s funny, they don’t look so tall from up here.” Senior Master Sgt. McCool

As I reflected on what he said I realized his statement mirrored my career. As I was looking ahead at each challenge I faced, the mountains appeared so tall, but as I climbed them and looked back down I discovered they weren’t as tall as I thought they were.

My first “mountain” came on the morning of Aug. 3, 1995, when my dad drove me to the Military Entrance Processing Station in Phoenix, Ariz. I can remember it as if it was yesterday — standing under the fluorescent lights outside the building. The fear that had been building over the last year in the Delayed Entry Program was now staring me in the face. I was leaving home for the first time to attend Basic Military Training (BMT). The “mountain” seemed enormous and I almost begged my dad to take me back home, but his words of encouragement were the reason I was able to walk into the building that morning and survive the next six weeks of basic.

It wasn’t until three years later when I returned to BMT that I realized the “mountain” didn’t seem so tall. These experiences continued throughout my career as a health services apprentice, a member of the base honor guard, a military training instructor and here in recruiting duty. I have been fortunate to have many mentors and peers along the way who made the climb much more enjoyable. As you face mountains, find someone to help with your climb and know that someday you will be able to look back on each “mountain” in a different light.

Photo: U.S. Air Force Senior Master Sgt. Kathleen McCool (right), Air Force Recruiting Service recruiter screening team superintendent, counsels a prospective recruiter. She was recognized as the Air Education and Training Command senior noncommissioned officer of the year for 2010. (courtesy photo)