Tag Archives: Air Force Reserve

One big Air Force

By Tech. Sgt. Anthony Nelson Jr.
Air Force Social Media

It’s not a foreign principle in the Air Force to understand that we participate, train, educate and support one another as fellow Airmen. In my opinion, it’s truly part of what makes us the world’s greatest Air Force.

But what does that really look like?

Over the last few years, I’ve had the opportunity to work side-by-side with members of the Air Force Reserve and Air National Guard. I’ve seen firsthand that there isn’t any difference in our performance, standards and expectations for one another as Total Force Airmen. I’m glad to be a part of a truly diverse organization where it’s really important to embody all aspects of the organization to grow and become better in the future.

“We are absolutely committed to creating a fully integrated operationally relevant and capable total force,” said Gen. Mark A. Welsh III, Air Force chief of staff. “One Air Force.”

During my deployments to the Middle East, I’ve had the privilege to really learn from my Guard and Reserve brothers and sisters in the Air Force. I learned that they carried pride in the uniform and their respective component. What drew them to the Air National Guard or Reserve was the same thing that drew me — wanting to serve my country in an honorable way. Not only did I work with them, but I also lived with them in a deployed environment.

When we worked long days and nights pulling security detail on the flight line or providing input about current operations to our leadership, we realized that in order for unit cohesion and morale to improve it would be imperative for us to address the issues that stood in front of us.

We talked about our different experiences and jobs in the Air Force. We shared old war stories while at our current war. The conversation became a bridge that would allow us to discover the root of our issues with one another. Simply, I had brought my negative bias and stereotypes about Guardsmen and Reservists into this environment. Those thoughts didn’t help bring us together faster but became a barrier for me personally.

One conversation led me to discover that I had a misconception of what the other parts of the Air Force did. I admitted to my fellow Airmen that I assumed I knew their mission and vision.

“We are held to AFIs and regulations just like Active Duty,” said Air National Guard Tech Sgt. Charlette Castro.

We are all Airmen, and it’s our duty to incorporate the institutional competencies of the Air Force. We also need to remember that our responsibility to brothers and sisters in the profession of arms isn’t segregated to active duty only. It encompasses the Total Force.

I’m glad to be part of a truly diverse organization where it’s really important to embody all aspects of the organization in order to grow and become better.

 

Following dad’s advice

By Bo Joyner
Headquarters, Air Force Reserve Command Public Affairs

What’s your story? Brig. Gen. Richard Scobee likes to ask this question to every Airman he meets, and he encourages others to do the same.

“The next time you see an Airman, ask what his or her story is,” Scobee said. “I guarantee you will come away inspired and impressed.”

Brig. Gen. Richard Scobee and his son, Andrew, kneel near the grave of Dick Scobee earlier this year during the NASA Day of Remembrance. Dick Scobee was the commander of the Space Shuttle Challenger, which exploded shortly after launch in 1986. His grave is near the memorials to the Space Shuttles Challenger and Columbia in Arlington National Cemetery’s Section 46. (Courtesy photo)
Brig. Gen. Richard Scobee and his son, Andrew, kneel near the grave of Dick Scobee during the NASA Day of Remembrance Jan. 31, 2014. Dick Scobee was the commander of the Space Shuttle Challenger, which exploded shortly after launch in 1986. His grave is near the memorials to the Space Shuttles Challenger and Columbia in Arlington National Cemetery’s Section 46. (Courtesy photo)

Scobee, commander of 10th Air Force at Naval Air Station Joint Reserve Base in Fort Worth, Texas, has an inspiring story of his own to tell. He’s the son of astronaut Dick Scobee who commanded the Space Shuttle Challenger that was destroyed after takeoff in 1986.

Continue reading Following dad’s advice

Just fly your airplane

By Bo Joyner
Headquarters, Air Force Reserve Command Public Affairs

Maj. Gen. Stayce Harris is the first female numbered air force commander in the history of Air Force Reserve Command, but it’s not easy to get her to talk about her groundbreaking career. She would much rather chat about the 15,000 Air Force reservists who keep 22nd Air Force flying and fighting every day in 23 locations.

“The 22nd has some amazing missions,” said Harris, who assumed command in July 2014 over the Reserve’s tactical air mobility operations and other vital mission sets like undergraduate pilot training, flight test operations and a highly mobile civil engineering response force.

Aircrews from the 22nd AF fly a variety of missions to include aerial spray, fire suppression, hurricane hunting and troop transport using the C-130 Hercules.

Gen. Darren W. McDew, Air Mobility Command commander, and Hillard W. Pouncy, an original Tuskegee Airman, pin stars on Harris during her recent promotion ceremony. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Jaclyn McDonald/Released)
Gen. Darren W. McDew, Air Mobility Command commander, and Hillard W. Pouncy, an original Tuskegee Airman, pin stars on Harris during her recent promotion ceremony. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Jaclyn McDonald/Released)

Continue reading Just fly your airplane

Waldo Canyon fire

Waldo Canyon Fire

By Staff Sgt. Amanda Dick
U.S. Air Force Public Affairs Agency

As the Waldo Canyon fire engulfed the U.S. Air Force Academy has continued, base residents some U.S. Air Force Academy campus residents were evacuated to safety June 26, 2012, Colorado Springs, Colo. Experience this force of nature from the perspective of an Academy photographer with these captivating images.

Photo: A tremendous smoke cloud builds around the U.S. Air Force Academy in Colorado Springs, Colo., June 26, 2012. Winds in excess of 65 mph created billowing and rapidly building smoke from the local Waldo Canyon fire. (U.S. Air Force photo by Mike Kaplan)

Dispatch from the AOR–One interesting experience for an AF Reserve M.D.

Below is a post from Lt. Col. E. Mark Shusterman, M.D., who is serving as the tour doctor with the Tour for the Troops.

TourDrI’ve done a few things during my 14 year Air Force Reserve career that most doctors, let alone most people, would not have the opportunity to experience in the civilian world; this gig has to be right up there on the not-quite-usual scale… A couple of months ago, I hardly imagined being on tour with the Band of the USAF Reserve, Kid Rock, Jessie James, and Carlos Mencia, traveling to six countries in barely two weeks. But an e-mail showed up in my inbox, and here I am; funny how life brings some marvelous adventures in the most unexpected ways. And an adventure this has been.

When I found out that I would be providing medical support for this mission, I wasn’t quite sure what to expect. As it turned out, this job has not been much different than that of any medical professional providing care to a group of seventy or so performing artists, technical crew, and other personnel, traveling at break-neck speed from country to country in tactical airlift and tanker aircraft, putting on almost nightly shows for U.S. and coalition troops at various “undisclosed” locations throughout South-West Asia and Europe. Ah, yeah…

Fortunately, so far, the need for my services has been confined to dispensing the occasional decongestant, headache pill, and suturing up the lacerations of road crew who roll off fifteen foot stages to narrowly escape a crushing death beneath thousand-pound equipment cases tumbling off fork lifts. At a place somewhere in a middle-eastern desert one needs to wear armor to fly into. Ah, yeah again…

It’s been one interesting experience. Just the sort of thing I’d hoped for when I joined the Air Force Reserves a year or so after medical school graduation.

Lt. Col. Mark Shusterman, an Air Force Reservist, is a physician traveling with the 2009 Tour for the Troops. Tour for the Troops is sponsored by the Air Force Reserve. See photos, video and updates on the Tour for the Troops Facebook fan page.  Follow Air Force Reserve on Twitter @AFRC. Look for tour updates on Twitter at #Tour4Troops