Tag Archives: Air Force Week

Air Force Week: it’s about what we do, Aug. 21, 2012

By Tanya Schusler
Air Force Public Affairs Agency

Day three of Air Force Week in New York City will start in just a couple hours. It’s actually the last day of nearly a week of pre-event activities, flyovers, musical performances, displays and appearances. This has been a chance for Airmen to show off what they do with pride and to also make connections with supporters. To catch up on the highlights of Air Force Week, see our story on Storify.

Photo: The Air Force Thunderbirds fly across the New York skyline in preparation for Air Force Week.

After weather delays, Discovery revealed during ‘Rollback’

By Lance CheungXenon lights

Defense Media Activity-San Antonio

Nov. 3, 2010

Despite weather from the west rolling through the area a few days ago, I finally watched the sun set and xenon lights (click for video) come on from 1/4 mile away.

Seeing Discovery revealed (click for video) was momentous. To see the culmination of will, drive, integrity and technology in the stylized shape of a bird destined to soar was moving.

I can hardly wait to see this bird lift its wings upward. Check out this cool video of the rollback of the Rotating Service Structure.

PHOTOS: (Top) Space shuttle Discovery shines in the distance, seen from the media center Nov. 3, 2010, at the Kennedy Space Complex, Fla. In the marina, a mooring points to launch complex 39A where xenon lights cast beams into the sky and clouds. Between now and launch time, numerous checks will be accomplished before the mission will be ready to go, but because of a weather delay the launch is expected to be Friday. Late that morning the space travelers will head to the launch complex to be strapped in and prepare to blast-off into space. (U.S. Air Force photo/Lance Cheung)
(Bottom left) Photographers stand ready for the rollback of the rotating service structure and reveal of orbiter Discovery at launch complex 39A, Nov. 3, 2010, Kennedy Space Complex, Fla. The clouds are a weather front that has delayed the launch by one day. Weather forecasting is handled by the 45th Weather Squadron at Patrick Air Force Base, Fla.  (U.S. Air Force photo/Lance Cheung)
(Bottom right) The massive rotating service structure swings away from the space shuttle revealing the orbiter Discovery Nov. 3, 2010, at the Kennedy Space Complex, Fla. Between now and launch time, numerous checks will be accomplished before the mission will be ready to go. But, because of a weather delay the launch is expected to be Friday. Late that morning the space travelers will head to the launch complex to be strapped in and prepare to blast-off into space. STS-133 will be commanded by retired (USAF) Colonel Steve Lindsey. This final flight of Discovery will be piloted by active duty (USAF) Col. Eric Boe. The lead mission specialist is (USAF) Col. Alvin Drew. (U.S. Air Force photo/Lance Cheung)

Rain forecast highlights 45th Space Wing Weather Squadron support to Discovery

By Lance Cheung

Defense Media Activity-San Antonio

Nov. 2, 2010

It’s been a few days of waiting near Launch Complex 39A at Kennedy Space Center, mainly due to weather conditions. It’s given me a chance to learn about how closely the Kennedy Space Center and neighboring Cape Canaveral Air Station rely on the U.S. Air Force’s 45th Space Wing Weather Squadron at nearby Patrick Air Force Base to forecast weather for all operations.

The only concerns for the shuttle launch, as of Nov. 2, are the possibility of low-level clouds or rain showers within 20 nautical miles of the Shuttle Landing Facility. In the event of lightning, an 80-foot lightening mast is positioned atop the Fixed Service Structure high above the Space Shuttle Discovery.

PHOTO: During the “Kennedy Space Center: Today & Tomorrow” tour, the Space Shuttle Discovery can be viewed from one mile away on Launch Complex 39A, at Kennedy Space Center, Fla., on Nov. 1, 2010. The adjusted takeoff date is Nov 3. To make Space Shuttle launches as economical as possible, their reuse is crucial. Unlike rocket boosters previously used in the space program, the Space Shuttle’s solid rocket booster (SRB) casings and associated flight hardware are recovered at sea. The expended boosters are disassembled, refurbished and reloaded with solid propellant for reuse. The two retrieval ships that perform the SRB recovery, the Liberty Star and Freedom Star, are unique vessels specifically designed and constructed for this task. (Courtesy photo/Lance Cheung)

Looking back into space program history

By Lance Cheung

Defense Media Activity-San Antonio

Nov. 1, 2010

Today I had the opportunity to visit the greatest American rocket ever built: Saturn V. The Apollo crews (who consisted of military pilots, many from the Air Force) got to fly the most powerful American rocket ever built. What an amazing sight to see how much this rocket dwarfs the people who flock to see it.

PHOTO: Saturn V rocket. (Photo courtesy\Lance Cheung)