Tag Archives: Airman

Destined to fly

By Senior Airman Kristoffer Kaubisch
Minot Air Force Base Public Affairs

In a split second, her entire future was hanging in the balance. One minute she was cutting floor boards for her new house, the next, she was in survival mode as the saw kicked the board up and took her hand with the cut, completely amputating her hand. The only thing running through her mind was to stay calm and focus on saving herself.

“It was crazy how it all happened,” said Capt. Kristin Nelson, 23rd Bomb Squadron pilot. “It’s amazing how much self-aid buddy care helped. I stayed calm and hollered for my husband. I cut off the pressure point, elevated my arm and went in the house and laid on the floor.”

Capt. Kristin Nelson, 23rd Bomb Squadron pilot, prepares to take flight on Minot Air Force Base, N.D., April 30, 2015. It was Nelson’s first flight back since an accident that amputated her left hand. However, doctors were able to successfully re-attach it. (U.S. Air Force photo/Senior Airman Kristoffer Kaubisch)
Capt. Kristin Nelson, 23rd Bomb Squadron pilot, prepares to take flight on Minot Air Force Base, N.D., April 30, 2015. It was Nelson’s first flight back since an accident that amputated her left hand. However, doctors were able to successfully re-attach it. (U.S. Air Force photo/Senior Airman Kristoffer Kaubisch)

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Sexual assault survivor: One Airman’s story

By a Survivor

Sexual assault is a hot topic — one addressed in annual training and at commander’s calls throughout the Air Force — yet the details of victims’ stories are seldom mentioned. This is understandable. These crimes against service members are intensely personal. Also, as many survivors have learned, listeners don’t always know how to respond appropriately, which can make sharing one’s story awkward, even painful.

This is unfortunate. As humans we are drawn to stories. We reflect upon them and even internalize some of their values, ideas and attitudes. Stories communicate with extraordinary effectiveness, enabling us to learn not only from personal experience but also from others’ experiences. Are we missing out on a potentially powerful tool in the world of sexual assault prevention? Perhaps calling on survivors to bravely share their stories holds real potential for making those serving alongside them more aware of sexual assault and of ways they can prevent it in their spheres of influence. To that end, here is my story.

Like most men I know, I never really thought much about sexual assault. I saw the issue as predominately a female problem that only happened to males under highly unusual circumstances and in unusual settings, such as prison. So, each year I endured the Air Force’s mandatory sexual assault training but never examined people in my life for indicators of predatory behavior, or spent any time considering issues like stalking, grooming, or consent. Little did I know that, like many other victims of both genders, I was oblivious to the impending threat until it was too late. Continue reading Sexual assault survivor: One Airman’s story

Nose art isn’t just for humans

By Staff Sgt. Jarrod Chavana
Air Force Public Affairs Agency

Since the conception of war planes, Airmen have figured out ways to personalize these aircraft and make them their own. During World War I, the artwork focused on squadron pride. During World War II and beyond, these paintings became more intricate and personal. I would call some of them masterpieces because they reflect the creativity and craftsmanship of the pilots and aircrew who flew these aircraft. During World War II, some Airmen and artists would make additional money and boost morale by incorporating these murals onto the noses or bodies of aircraft.

I thought I would go through some of the Air Force’s archives and find some great examples and share them with you. I will say, some of the nose art from World War II and later could make our mothers blush.

 

Nose art called "Lets make a deal"
“Lets Make a Deal” nose art from a Boeing B-52G that flew in Operation Desert Storm is on display in the Cold War Gallery at the National Museum of the United States Air Force. (U.S. Air Force photo/Released)

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Adventure to Lackland: Another Day in Paradise

By Senior Airman Soo C. Kim
Air Force Public Affairs Agency

Editor’s note: This is part two of a series detailing this author’s experiences at Air Force Basic Military Training and beyond. You can read part one of the series here.

A week and some days have passed since the fateful night we met our campaign-hat-of-doom. Most of us were still shivered at the sight of anything that remotely resembled that hat as if the Grim Reaper himself was staring directly into our soul. But, as the days went by, we slowly adapted to our new lifestyle.

Marching everywhere and avoiding eye contact with anyone who had more than two stripes became the norm. The yelling and push-ups began to sound and feel like loud sage advice and an opportunity to make my less-than-impressive “guns” stronger.
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What personal readiness means to me

By Tech. Sgt. Steve Grever
Air Force Public Affairs Agency

One of the biggest challenges facing the Air Force today is maintaining operational readiness and warfighting capabilities to meet the requirements of combatant commanders. The statement above includes many “strategic” words we hear from leadership at commander’s calls and other events, but they should impact every Airman wearing the uniform. All of us are work to accomplish the mission daily, which ensures the Air Force is ready to fight and win the nation’s wars.

Air Force senior leaders have the daunting task of getting us the right equipment and resources to meet and exceed the nation’s expectations. But, as Airmen, we are responsible for getting our personal readiness aligned with our leader’s strategies and vision for the future.

For me, personal readiness encompasses performing my job to the best of my ability and making sure my family and other aspects of my personal life are in order so I’m always ready to deploy or go on temporary duty assignments. This can be a difficult if you try to tackle it all at once, but I’ve found that breaking it down into groups of smaller tasks has helped me more easily manage work and family issues. When you have a plan to sync up your Air Force and personal responsibilities, it will help you reach your goal of attaining personal readiness that’s good for you, your family, the Air Force and the nation.

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