Tag Archives: Airmen

Airmen draping a flag over a casket.

Step Up, Step In: What’s a line of duty determination?

By Staff Sgt. Ryan Crane
USAFE-AFAFRICA Public Affairs

During the last five years, the Air Force notified the families of 232 Airmen that their son or daughter died.

Although most anyone can tell you the military can be a dangerous job and being put in harm’s way is often just part of the commitment, the most disturbing part about that statistic is 212 of those Airmen died while off duty.

Even more upsetting is that because of the circumstances surrounding the deaths, some families were paid no benefits. In every case, the deciding factor came down to the line of duty determination.

A line of duty determination investigation is conducted anytime a member acquires a debilitating disease, incurs a significant injury or dies under unusual circumstances, according to Capt. Mikal Nuhn, U.S. Air Forces in Europe and Air Forces Africa judge advocate. The findings determine whether or not death benefits are paid.

“When a military member is seriously injured or dies, certain statutory rights or benefits accrue to the member or their family,” Nuhn explained. “But only if the disability or death was attributed to military service, and in the line of duty.”

There are four possible outcomes of an LOD determination:
1. Condition existed prior to service and was not aggravated by service.
2. In the line of duty, not due to servicemember’s own misconduct.
3. Not in the line of duty and not due to the servicemember’s own misconduct.
4. Not in the line of duty and due to the sevicemember’s own misconduct.

Nuhn explained how to avoid the fourth outcome in very simple terms.

“Always behave in a reasonably safe manner because your actions could have unintended negative consequences for your loved ones,” he said.

This doesn’t mean you shouldn’t take a trip to Switzerland to go bungee jumping or hit the slopes to shred some powder. As long as you take all safety precautions these activities would likely be considered “in the line of duty” and you or your family would receive benefits.

However, a scenario that would likely not provide death benefits to your family is one that involves alcohol. An example is when an Airman drives drunk and puts himself and his family at risk, even if it is not his intention.

Making good choices and taking personal responsibility are key. The wingman concept is a great safety net, but in the end, every individual is responsible for his or her actions and consequences.

“By definition, all mishaps are preventable,” said Master Sgt. James Musgrave, USAFE-AFAFRICA mishap prevention manager.

Accidents happen, but there are always ways to minimize or eliminate risk in everything you do.

“While the younger Airmen have a good portion of the mishaps, no age or rank is immune to mishaps,” Musgrave explained. “It’s more of a psychology issue than an age issue.  ‘It will never happen to me’ is a common jinx if the speaker is not risk conscious.”

As the Air Force Safety Center motto states: “Safety is no accident.”

“Be risk aware, not inattentive,” said Musgrave. “One of the leading factors of mishaps is inattention, which sometimes is a result of boredom or a perceived absence of a threat. If Airmen are aware of the risks, they can control the ones that are controllable.”

For new parents, having children calls for drastic change on multiple fronts in their life; often times these adjustments can be hard to do while living the military lifestyle. The New Parent Support Program offered at Shaw Air Force Base, S.C., is geared toward helping with just that. It helps first-time parents, as well as parents with new additions to their family, gain confidence in their ability to raise their children. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Daniel Blackwell/Released)

Expecting in the military

By Senior Airman Michelle Patten
Air Force Public Affairs Agency

There are so many thoughts running through your mind when you first find out you’re going to be a parent. How do I share the news? Will it be a boy or a girl? What will the baby’s name be?

Then there are the thoughts of a military parent. When will I have to deploy and leave my baby behind? Who will take care of the baby when my husband and I both get called in to respond to a disaster in the middle of the night? When will the grandparents meet baby when we’re geographically? Continue reading

Portraits in courage

Portraits in Courage Volume 9

Meet some of the amazing Airmen who exemplify the Air Force core values of integrity first, service before self and excellence in all we do. Portraits in Courage Volume 9 recognizes five teams and seven individuals for their personal or moral courage in performance of their duties. Let’s meet them!

Find out what these Airmen did to be selected by reading their profiles here: http://static.dma.mil/usaf/courage/.

Which of these Airmen inspires you?

Air Force BMT graduates perform pass and review during their graduation parade

Best BMT moments

By Senior Airman Michelle Patten
Air Force Public Affairs Agency

Basic military training is the first step for every enlisted Airman’s career; it transforms you from a civilian into a military member. Many may remember seeing Joint Base San Antonio-Lackland’s “Gateway to the Air Force” sign or the buzzing sound of that first haircut. We asked our Facebook followers to share their top BMT moments and received over 1,000 comments! Do any of these bring back memories?

Bill Thomas- In 1968, giving blood during week 3 for the wounded of the Tet Offensive. Seconnd best memory is the perfect score on rifle range, but that’s expected of an East Tennessee Ridgerunner.
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