Tag Archives: Tech. Sgt. Nathan Gallahan

Airmen set bar for cyber journalism during trek through Afghanistan

By Tech. Sgt. Phyllis Hanson, Air Force Public Affairs Agency

100201-F-7734R-001Deployed to Afghanistan since October 2009, Tech. Sgts. Ken Raimondi and Nathan Gallahan came up with what they called a “pipe dream” which turned out to be an innovative way for an Air Force photojournalist and a broadcaster to share “big picture” Afghanistan first hand with readers and listeners, with immediacy, emotion and truth.

With a surprisingly quick approval from leadership, a thought in January became reality by February as the two Airmen, assigned to NATO’s International Security Assistance Force Joint Command Public Affairs, set off on their mission “to travel Afghanistan for 30 days to share the stories, meet the people and experience firsthand the counter insurgency.” Their cyber journalism journey, “30 Days through Afghanistan” had begun.

During a long-distance interview, March 26, for DoD Live Bloggers Roundtable the two Airmen shared their perspective of that journey and the difficulties, challenges and rewarding satisfaction they felt.

Over the course of what turned out be to 35 days, the Airmen vlogged (video broadcast) and blogged daily, covering the human perspective of what they encountered while covering all of ISAF’s five regional commands in Afghanistan.

What impressed me the most was that they did this day after day, camp after camp, making sure the communication kept rolling even if it took them into the wee hours of the night, to find a place to prepare and then tell their stories of that day’s adventure. Imagine the difficulties of getting an Internet connection there!

I thoroughly enjoyed the virtual travel with them. Although there were quite a few were “heart tugging” stories, they were able to mix in a little humor, too. It is also a good reminder that America isn’t fighting this battle alone as many of the stories focus on what American and Allied forces (NATO) see and do each day over in Afghanistan.

I look forward to seeing more of this type of reporting from our Air Force journalists and broadcasters in the future.

Pentagon Airman reflects on three Afghanistan stories

The holiday season is upon us. Everyone is getting ready for their various religious and secular activities. The vast majority of American will be spending the time with family and friends. Not all.

Many Airmen are deployed around the world, far from their loved ones.

Tech. Sgt. Nathan Gallahan, International Security Assistance Force Joint

Soldiers from the U.S. Army's 1-40 Cavalry Squadron sleep after devouring Thanksgiving chow at Camp Clark, Afghanistan Nov. 26. The soldiers have been patrolling daily and helping train the Afghan National Army since their arrival to the camp approximately one month ago. (ISAF Joint Command photo by Tech. Sgt. Nathan Gallahan)
Soldiers from the U.S. Army's 1-40 Cavalry Squadron sleep after devouring Thanksgiving chow at Camp Clark, Afghanistan Nov. 26. The soldiers have been patrolling daily and helping train the Afghan National Army since their arrival to the camp approximately one month ago. (ISAF Joint Command photo by Tech. Sgt. Nathan Gallahan)

Command, Afghanistan, recently wrote a blog about spending the holidays deployed to Afghanistan. Someone in the White House must have liked it. Sergeant Gallahan’s “Holiday Cheer for the Heroes” post appears on The White House Blog. He writes how appreciative servicemembers are to receive support from the American public, whether through simple cards or video greetings.

Then there were the holiday cards and smiles. I didn’t anticipate that.

At each location I visited, there were all these cards and banners reassuring the soldiers America loved them, supported them and prayed for their safe return. I saw soldier upon soldier holding these cards up and showing their friends what amusing little anecdote was scribbled within. The only possessions these soldiers had were what they could carry on their back and holiday cards from school children from across our beautiful nation.

These letters, cards, candies, cookies … especially cookies … reach these guys and bring smiles to their faces when happiness in warzones is a rare commodity.

But these days, sending care packages via mail to such remote sites is really hard, especially since you need to know someone here before you can send anything (for security reasons, sending them to units or “any soldier” is no longer allowed). The Department of Defense has a site though, that allows you to send video messages to service members. It’s a great way to show support over the holidays and is a lot faster than mail, which can take a month or more, sometimes, to arrive here.

Congratulations, Sergeant Gallahan, on the honor!

Pararescue in Afghanistan

What’s it like for Airmen who are dedicated to saving the lives of others? Fortunately, I’ve never had to rely on the services of pararescuemen during my deployments to Afghanistan and Iraq. Squadron highlights capabilities during Afghan rescue mission gives a first-hand look at the Airmen of the 66th Expeditionary Rescue Squadron of Camp Bastion, Afghanistan.

A soldier is wounded during a joint British and Afghanistan National Army

Pararescuemen receive an injured patient from coalition forces Dec. 8, 2009. The pararescuemen will administer medical care while in transit to a medical facility. The pararescuemen are assigned to the 66th Expeditionary Rescue Squadron deployed to Camp Bastion, Afghanistan. (U.S. Air Force photo/Staff Sgt. Angelita Lawrence)
Pararescuemen receive an injured patient from coalition forces Dec. 8, 2009. The pararescuemen will administer medical care while in transit to a medical facility. The pararescuemen are assigned to the 66th Expeditionary Rescue Squadron deployed to Camp Bastion, Afghanistan. (U.S. Air Force photo/Staff Sgt. Angelita Lawrence)

patrol in Helmand Province. Shot through both legs, his condition worsens while being cared for by the medics. It is time to call in the professionals to get him off the battlefield and to the hospital. The radios erupt with words the crews had been standing by for:

“SCRAMBLE…SCRAMBLE…SCRAMBLE!”

Rushing from their squadron tents and huts, located close to the flightline and their HH-60G Pave Hawk helicopters, the crews run to the waiting aircraft, strap in, start the engines and within minutes they are airborne on their way to the patient.

Time is of the essence and these Airmen from the 66th Expeditionary Rescue Squadron take it very seriously.

On board the helicopter, racing back to the base, the pararescuemen work as a team, tending to the patient. One handles all injuries below the waist, while the other takes care of any concerns above. They work quickly to bandage the wound on the left leg, preventing any further blood loss and verifying no nerve damage occurred.

Whiteman Airman survives IED blast

One thing I learned at the Indiana University School of Journalism and the Defense Information School is the danger of using a quote lead. The instructors warned against using them. They rarely work well to grab the reader’s attention, the instructors said.

Sometimes, they work.

Here’s one that grabbed my attention from Whiteman Airman recalls moment of terror:

“I don’t remember seeing a flash or hearing a boom. I just remember waking up in the turret with my head on fire.”

That is what Staff Sgt. Charles Holley recalled from the moment an improvised explosive device exploded and bathed his Humvee in fire last year in Tiqurit [sic], Iraq.

This excellent feature tells of an Airman’s actions following an improvised explosive device attack on the vehicle he served as gunner.

(Pentagon Airman is written by Master Sgt. Russell P. Petcoff, Secretary of the Air Force Public Affairs.)