Tag Archives: tweetchat

Transitional needs of military spouses and families April 16 tweetchat

By Air Force Public Affairs Agency

If you missed our April 16 tweetchat regarding transitional needs of military spouses and families with Mrs. Betty Welsh, Chief of Staff of the Air Force spouse and Mrs. Athena Cody, Chief Master Sergeant of the Air Force spouse, you can catch up on the questions and answers below!

Q1: As a relocating spouse, what transition assistance services are available to help me find employment at our new location? #BettyWelsh
A1a: There is the Virtual Curriculum in Transition GPS classes you take w/your spouse http://tinyurl.com/kx8d478 #BettyWelsh
A1b: Take advantage of @MSEPjobs (Military Spouse Employment Partnership) http://tinyurl.com/ln65fmw up to 6 months after your spouse separation date. #BettyWelsh
A1c: Check out your new state on American Job Centers for vets/family employment assistance http://jobcenter.usa.gov/ #BettyWelsh

Q2: How is the Air Force going to help transition Airmen out of the Air Force? #BettyWelsh
A2a: A&FRC (Airman & Family Readiness Center) offer the congressionally mandated Transition Assistance Program (TAP) or Transition Goals Plans Success(GPS) #BettyWelsh
A2b: New TAP is better than ever! 4 core blocks & 3 in depth tracks prep you for education, training or entrepreneurship #BettyWelsh

Q3: My spouse has prep’d for this transition & has landed an excellent job. Does he/she have to take all this TAP stuff? #BettyWelsh
A3: Pre-sep counseling, capstone & VA brief are required, but proof of employment can exempt them from TAP/GPS #BettyWelsh

Q4: I’m a stay-at-home-mom so I can’t make it to the TAP workshop, is there a way I can participate in the TAP/GPS workshop? #BettyWelsh
A4: Yes, all TAP workshops have a virtual option. Your spouse can set up access for you or visit your local A&FRC #BettyWelsh

Q5: Do Airmen and their families receive any benefits beyond their separation dates? #BettyWelsh
A5a: TERA (temporary early retirement authority) & SERB (selective early retirement boards) members receive all retirement benefits. #BettyWelsh
A5b: Involuntary separation benefits include 180 days medical, two years BX (Base Exchange)/Commissary, PTDY (permissive temporary duty), NAF (Numbered Air Force) hiring pref & more. #BettyWelsh

Q6: Is everyone separating eligible for 20 days CONUS & 30 days OCONUS permissive TDY for house hunting & job hunting? #BettyWelsh
A6:  Members who retire or are under VSP (voluntary separation program), involuntary separation or separate in lieu of meeting a retention board are eligible for PTDY #BettyWelsh

Q7: Will individuals selected for involuntary separation or retirement have to repay Transfer of Education Benefits (TEB) to family? #BettyWelsh
A7: No repayment needed for most members selected to involuntary separation/retire under the Fiscal Year 2014 FM (force management) –visit http://tinyurl.com/l4wzok5 #BettyWelsh

Q8: My spouse may apply for VSP–is there 180-day Tricare coverage & two-year of commissary privileges as part of the VSP benefits? #BettyWelsh
A8: No, the extended benefits are only for involuntary separation. They are not authorized for those who voluntarily separate. #BettyWelsh

Q9: Can key spouses receive information on the links mentioned & share at their squadrons? #BettyWelsh
A9: Key spouses should visit A&FRC to gather info on these sources and share with squadrons.

Q10: Will civilians resources or liaisons be available for separating EFMP (Exceptional Family Member Program) families? #BettyWelsh
A10: It’s important for spouses to attend TAP briefing along with mil member to get that tailored info.

Q11: Who is helping spouses with licensure transfers after relocation? #BettyWelsh
A11: @MSEPjobs and @JoiningForces are partnering on license portability.

The next Air Force tweetchat will feature security forces with both an officer and an enlisted Airmen joining us as guests on April 24. Stay tuned!

Mrs. Welsh and Mrs. Cody Jan 21 tweetchat

By Air Force Public Affairs Agency
Social Media Division

In case you missed out on our Jan. 21 tweetchat with Mrs. Betty Welsh, Chief of Staff of the Air Force spouse and Mrs. Athena Cody, Chief Master Sergeant of the Air Force spouse, you can catch up on the questions and answers below!

Q1: Why does it seem so difficult to get into a routine and break old habits?
A1: A1: It takes time & perseverance to change behaviors and establish new habits. On average–66 days! (cont) #BettyWelsh
A1 (cont): Start out with a reasonable goal– know that with time & patience you will create long-lasting change. #BettyWelsh

Q2: How do I get started on my 2014 Healthy Living goals?
A2: First, list your goals & then break them down into achievable steps. Engage your family & friends for support.

Q3: What resources have you found or tools to help you stay on track that you would like to share with us?
A3: We have great resources to support you as well—check http://www.usaffitfamily.com/home

Q4: @AFWSOWIFE asks what would be the No. 1 best new habit to get started on the most healthy lifestyle? #BettyWelsh
A4: .@AFWSOWIFE Healthy eating helps you feel better, have more energy, prevents major illnesses to include heart disease, high blood pressure.

Q5: @usairforce is there a program for civilians to get fit and enlist? #dreamjob #BettyWelsh
A5: @SafariBear1107 Ask local recruiting office for advice to meet your goals! Airforce.com has a list of recruiters. #BettyWelsh


Q6: For the tweetchat followers to answer! How many of you have set goals for this year, and what are they? #BettyWelsh

Q7: Can you live at home and still work in the Air Force day to day if you live in the region of the base? #BettyWelsh
A7: @FastTrack_Shaq: Contact your ANG or AFR office for opportunities to serve! See GoANG.com. #BettyWelsh

Q8: Do you have some stress reducing activities that you would like to share?
#BettyWelshA8: Stress by itself wears down our health and well-being. As military spouses we forget that saying NO is OK! (cont) #BettyWelsh
A8 (cont): We must take time for ourselves in order to take care of others. #BettyWelsh

Q9: @Kaboom_Krusader: What can the Air Force offer towards a culinary arts career? Is it a competitive field? #BettyWelsh
A9: The Air Force sends services personnel and enlisted aides to culinary training. #BettyWelsh

Q10: What is a good workout to help train for pararescue? #BettyWelsh
A10: Military.com outlines the requirements for passing the PJ fitness test & advice for prep for it. @Militarydotcom #BettyWelsh

Q11: @AFWSOWIFE: @AFYouthPrograms Any network for work out buddies to connect with in the DC area? #BettyWelsh
A11: Sorry we can’t endorse any networks. Please do a search for workout groups. #BettyWelsh

Q12: Who do I contact to run track while in the Air Force? #BettyWelsh
A12: Talk with a recuiter. For more information check out academyadmissions.com/admissions/. #BettyWelsh

Q13: If I transfer from another service, will my rank be reset? #BettyWelsh
A13: Check with an Air Force recruiter, and you can chat with one on airforce.com. #BettyWelsh

Q14: If doing ROTC, can someone be an astronaut? #BettyWelsh
A14: Yes, it’s a possibility if you’re on the right career path and meet the requirements. #BettyWelsh

Q15: #BettyWelsh Has being a military spouse helped your own ability to stay committed to health & fitness in any way?
A15: I think a few of the lessons I’ve learned about flexibility, resilience and knowing that taking care of others starts with taking care of myself has helped me stay connected tothe importance of healthy living.

Q16: How do you find time during your busy lives to exercise/eat healthy? Some days it’s so hard!

A16: You have to schedule it into your day, and stick to it – don’t change
that part of your schedule. The first month is always the toughest!
A16 contd: The Air Force is moving to 24-hour gyms to help us fit the gym into
our busy schedules. Now there’s no excuse! (followed by A1 tweets about 24
hour gyms).

Q17: How do you encourage your family/children to be active & fit?
A17: Lead by example! And set goals as a family…working together to
accomplish fitness goals can strengthen your family beyond the gym.

Stay tuned for our next chat!

CMSAF and Mrs. Cody Dec. 4 tweetchat

CMSAF James Cody participates in a tweetchat.
by Air Force Public Affairs Agency
Social Media Division

Chief Master Sgt. of the Air Force James A. Cody and Mrs. Athena Cody particpated in their first tweetchat together Dec. 4 and received 16 questions from Twitter followers regarding the topic: Raising a Family in the Military. During the hour-long event, Chief Cody’s team and the Air Force Social Media Team answered questions about PT scores and the WAPS system, to personnel cutbacks, commissary closures and military family and career advice. We had the pleasure of chatting with Chief and Mrs. Cody in person, but in case you missed it, here are all the questions and answers from the chat. Stay tuned for our next #USAFChat event!

Q1: To improve the PT program as well as the WAPS system, why not include members’ PT score in the WAPS calculation?
A1: We’ve looked at it & we’re not going to go in that direction. That is only one of many standards you have to achieve. (cont)
A1(cont): There are many factors that can impact your PT test & we don’t think it should be valued more than it already is.

Q2: Will education be factored into being retained during cutbacks, or is it a wrong place wrong time kind of thing?
A2: Performance will be the primary factor, and currently we aren’t looking at education as a discerning factor in retention.

Q3: Are there plans for an option, similar to join-spouse option, to help divorced or single parents stay closer to their children?
A3: We can appreciate the concern this presents for some Amn & their families. Currently we’re not looking at this, however (cont)
A3(cont): it’s something we could consider as a topic to present at our Caring for People Forum.

Q4: What are the plans if the govt shuts down again in January?
A4: Implications of a govt shutdown in January, if it were to occur, would be driven through the OPM and DOD.

Q5: Chief with reduction in Amn numbers do you see essential personnel moving away from siloed AFSCs to generalist functional duties?
A5: No. Any force management decisions will be focused on AFSCs with overages.

Q6: Any concern using E5 & E6 strat method for special duty assignment selections & depleting talent from units/career fields?
A6: No, there is no restriction or fenced career fields as it relates to the nominations. (cont)
A6(cont): We will not select Airmen to leave career fields that will be unable to perform their mission w/o these Airmen.

Q7: How will we retain enlisted in growing highly technical fields like cyber and intel afsc?
A7: If we identify a problem w/ retention in these career fields, options are available to offer incentives to increase retention.

Q8: Has the true impact of closing commissaries been studied?
A8: There has been no decision to close commissaries. We’re currently looking at the implications & impact this could have. (cont)
A8(cont):The current fiscal situation has forced the DOD to look at everything. (cont)
A8(cont): We do appreciate the concern and potential impact this would have on our Airmen and their families.

Q9: What additional measures are being considered for force management – additional TERA retirements, palace chase, etc?
A9: We are considering all available options. While we’ve not yet implemented these measures, our first option will be to (cont)
A9(cont): offer voluntary programs and incentives to our Airmen to meet required end strength.

Q10: Coming from a young Airman, what is your best advice to make chief?
A10: Be really, really good at your job. Performance is key.

Q11: What advice would you have for a young dual military couple?
A11: Support one other. It takes a team & both must be equal partners. (cont)

Q12: If you have a civilian wife, is she guaranteed to live with you on base?
A12: If you’re authorized & housing is available, your spouse can live w/ you. There are no guarantees housing will be available.

Q13: If retirement age changes to 65, will those alrdy in be grandfathered so they still receive it after 20+ yrs of service?
A13: The current position in the DOD and of the service chiefs is that any changes to the current retirement system (cont)
A13(cont): would have a provision to grandfather those currently serving; they would fall in the current system.

Q14: Any tips for getting promoted Below the Zone?
A14: The key is to be the very best at your job. To be promoted ahead of your peers, you need to be better than others. (cont)
A14(cont): Your performance must clearly set you apart.

Q15: I’m thinking about joining, but have a young family. Would you still recommend it?
A15: Certainly if your desire is to serve, I’d highly recommend it. Only make this decision if you’ve done so as a family. (cont)
A15(cont): The family serves, not just the one wearing the uniform. There will be challenges that you’ll both face.

Q16: There was a meeting recently with MTI spouses. What about other special duty spouses who face similar issues?
A16: No question we want to meet with all of our spouses & will make ourselves available to do so – just let us know. (cont)
A16(cont): When we visit bases, units, etc., our intent is to be available to spouses as well.

Q17: Are you looking at lowering high year tenure in career fields that are SNCO heavy?
A17: No, we’re not looking at making any changes pertaining to that at this time.

AFRS July tweetchat

Carissa PictureThe Air Force Recruiting Service participated in its second tweetchat July 18 and received nearly 100 recruitment questions from online participants. During the hour-long Web event, AFRS officials answered questions about enlistment eligibility requirements, Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery test scores and other career field-specific questions. The first 20 questions were answered during the tweetchat. The rest of the unanswered questions are below. AFRS will host monthly tweetchats showcasing Airmen from different career fields who will share their Air Force experiences.

PHOTO: Carissa, Air Force Recruiting Service online advisor

Q21: Is the best flight training through the AF or a college?
A21: If you want to be an AF pilot, go through the AF. You get paid, while getting the best training to fly the most advanced aircraft.

Q22 I’m on a quick ship out contract and I’ve been waiting 7 months to leave for a security forces job. Is there a cut back on jobs?
A22: No, we have 8K+ people waiting for jobs, we book 2,200 a month. There may be a delay with the large number of people joining.

Q23 How long does it usually take to transfer from guard to active?
A23: Depends on qualifications & jobs available in Prior Service program. Contact AF Live Chat for details here.

Q24: Is it true that basic training is going to be shortened to 6 weeks again?
A24: No, it will remain 8 1/2 weeks in length.

Q25: What is the stance on #PriorService members trying to rejoin? Are #PriorService members encouraged to reenlist?
A25: The program will access approx. 250 applicants in 2013. Please visit here for more details.

Q26: How exactly does BMI work when there are already weight requirements?
A26: No BMI, must meet height/weight requirements.

Q27: I got an 87 on my ASVAB but wanted a higher score. Would it change anything if I took it again and got around a 90?
A27: 87 is very high>You won’t qualify for more jobs with a higher score. Your physical will determine the rest.

Q28: Do you have to run 20 miles in a certain amount of time?
A28: PT for MALES: 1.5 Mile Run — < 30 years of age – 1.5 mile run in <11:57 & FEMALES: 1.5 Mile Run — < 30 years of age – <14:26

Q29: Is it better to be active duty right away, or join the reserves?
A29: Depends on what your goals are. It’s hard to go from Guard/Reserve to active duty & very limited.

Q30: What exactly does the Chow Runner do?
A30: Chow Runners request permission for their flights to eat their meals in Basic Military Training.

Q31: Can you elucidate whether the recruits could be Americans or whether they could be foreign nationals as well?
A31: You must meet the reqs http://bit.ly/12yNTco and legally reside in US with a “Green Card.”

Q32: How difficult is it to get into MWD after you join and get a SF contract?
A32: You must be in for 2 years, meet qualifications, apply & be selected.

Q33: What is the main difference between an AF Academy education compared to a Division I ROTC program?
A33: They are both great opportunities to earn a degree and get commissioned. Apply for both & see where it takes you.

Q34: Does the USAFA automatically disqualify applicants with a record of a broken bone?
A34: If you do not meet the physical requirements, it is for the safety &health concern for the applicant. Safety first.

Q35: I was told I could go to college with an ROTC program first and sign a contract with the AF so they will pay for it. is this true?
A35: There are scholarship opportunities through the AFROTC program here.

Q36: I heard a rumor that BMT is being shortened to 7.5 wks, combining weapons training/BEAST; is this true?
A36: No, it will remain 8 1/2 weeks in length.

Q37: If I go through AFROTC or the AFA, what are the options for getting a masters degree if I still want to be a pilot?
A37: Tuition Assistance, GI Bill, AFIT & other educational programs are available to achieve your educational goals.

Q38: Does being blind in one eye still disqualify one from serving in the Air Force or all branches of the military?
A38: Yes, that would be disqualifying.

Q39: So if the job somebody wants isn’t open in the AF they have to go on a waiting list?
A39: You will list 5+ jobs once you process based on what you qual for, we will guarantee you one of your choices.

Q40: What are the chances of me getting my #1 pick which was Security Forces? Also, is that job in demand?
A40: SF is one of our largest career fields, so your chances are great as long as it’s open and you qualify.

Q41: Can you obtain a waiver for an injury if you want to commission as an officer?
A41: Possibly…depends on what the waiver request is for.

Q42: What’s the wash out rate for TACP training? And if you do wash out can you try again?
A4: It’s about 60-70%. If you wash out or self-eliminate, there is no guarantee you can stay in the AF.

Q43: is air transportation a dangerous job?
A43: No, there is minimal exposure to hazardous environments. Go here for more info.

Q44: I have a very small VSD that does not affect my ability to perform high physical tasks. Am I able to join the Air Force with it?
A44: Heart conditions may be disqualifying, but the Dr at MEPS will make that determination. Ask your recruiter to have the MEPS Dr prescreen your medical records for a preliminary ruling.

Q45: I heard that women are allowed to be in the PJs now. Is that true?
A45: We’re still awaiting policy changes from the Office of the Secretary of Defense. Check updates here.

Q46: Does the air force accept people that have had kidney stones?
A46: Kidney stones are potentially medically disqualifying, but the Dr at MEPS will make that determination. Ask your recruiter to have the MEPS Dr prescreen your medical records for a preliminary ruling.

Q47: What’s a good job field to get into in the AF?
A47: You will get a list of jobs you are eligible for. You will list 5+ choices and we will guarantee you one of those.

Q48: Is there an age range to become an AF pilot?
A48: You must meet the selection board prior to age 28.

Q49 How long is the actual training for a PJ before deployment?
A49: 18 months of tech school training, with upgrade training just prior to deployment.

Q50: I’m interested in becoming a pararescue. What are the requirements?
A50: AFQT-36, General-41. You must also pass the PAST test. Check out the PJ page here for more info.

Q51: What’s the most common job in the Air Force, like Army has infantry & marines have infantry?
A51: Security Forces is the largest career field in the AF.

Q52: What’s the best way to explain TACP?
A52: TACP deploy to battlefield areas in support of Special Operations Forces. Find more info here.

Q53: How can you become an officer in the Air Force?
A53: You may apply for OTS with most any college degree, go thru AF ROTC or attend AF Academy.

Q54: How can I be a fuel specialist?
A54: ASVAB, Mechanical-47 and General-38. Must pass color/vision test, be a US cit, have valid driver’s license & pass PT req.

Q55: Why have we been stuck at Holloman AFB for almost 5 years. We’re ready to goooooooo!
A55: Please contact your MPF assignments. Assignments are different for every career.

Q56: Would I be sent to Lackland AFB because I live in Texas or could I be sent to another base?
A56: All Air Force enlisted members will go to Lackland AFB for BMT, after that, your assignment depends on your preferences, job and needs of the AF among other factors.

Q57: Where can I find the full physical requirements?
A57: You can find information on physical requirements here.

Q58: What are possible Duty Stations for UAS Sensor Operator?
A58: You will be provided a list of bases for your career field at BMT. Click here for more information.

Q59: Do you have plans to reinstate the AECP program?
A59: Please contact your education office on base. They are in charge of that program.

Q60: How long would you have to wait to see if you’re qualified to work with military dogs? When you’re already in security forces?
A60: One you get your 5-skill level, Airman 1st Class, you can apply to work with MWD. It’s about 2 yrs from when you join.

Q61: Also, is it possible to switch languages with someone at DLI as long as you both qualify for each other’s language?
A61: No, each person is interviewed and slotted for each language. Once assigned, that is what the Airman is selected for.

Q62: At what age can you join the Air Force?
A62: Non-prior service applicants must be at least 17 to apply and in Basic Military Training before their 28th birthday.

Q63: Why did you join the Air Force?
A63: I wasn’t interested in college & knew the awesome opportunities & benefits the AF offered. Plus, I wanted to see the world.

Q64: Can you go to PJ school after basic training or do you have to serve as something before?
A64: This job is determined prior to BMT. You can apply if you qualify and pass the physical test for it. Check out more info here.

Q65: What is the minimum weight required for a male who is 6′ 1? Is BMI considered?
A65: No BMI. You must be at least 5 lbs. under your max weight for your recruiter to process you. Your max for 6’1″ is 208 lbs. The minimum allowable weight is 144lbs.

Q66: I’m interested in doing Operation Intelligence What’s the minimum ASVAB score?
A66: The minimum score required is General 57. Recommend studying for higher score to be competitive.

Q67: What jobs see combat?
A67: The most combat-related jobs are PJ, TACP, CCT.

Q68: I already took my ASVAB. Do I find out when I leave and my job at MEPS?
A68: Please contact your local recruiter to find out when you leave and what job you’ll have.

Q69: How likely is it to get a job with K-9 units? How do you become a handler?
A69: You must meet requirements and then apply. Must be 5-skill level, submit application and be selected.

Q70: Are tattoos allowed? If so where shouldn’t you have them?
A70: It varies based on the imagery, message, size, as well as location. Check here  for more info.

Q71: When can I switch bases when I arrive at my first duty station?
A71: You can update your “dream sheet” and once you fulfill your time on station be eligible to move.

Q72: How long do pilots have to be in flight school?
A73: UPT is 12 to 18 months.

Q73: What are the benefits of joining the Air Force as an Officer?
A73: The benefits include higher pay and different career opportunities. Read more here.

Q74: Is it better for a college graduate to enlist in the reserves or active duty?
A74: Depends on what your goals are. It’s hard to go from guard/reserve to active duty and very limited.

Q75: What is the TACP pipeline schedule?
A56: Schedules are not published. If selected for TACP, you will get orders with dates for BMT and tech school.

Q76: When the USAAF was suffering the highest causality rate in WWII, did it ever have to turn to non-volunteer draftees?
Q76: Yes, during WWII the Army Air Corps issued a draft. The nation hasn’t had a draft in 35 years.

Q77: I know there’s a height requirement to be a pilot, but what about other airborne jobs? Like airborne cryptologist?
A77: The minimum height for an airborne cryptologist is 64 in / 5 ft 4 in.

Q78: How often does a transfer from guard to active usually take?
A78: It varies. The prior service program is limited & it’s hard to transfer into active duty. Contact a recruiter for details.

Q79: How can I become an officer with a nursing degree?
A79: You will need a BSN or BAN degree from an accredited institution. Find additional info here.

Q80: Can I legally photograph AF aircraft from the roadside adjacent to a base?
A80: Normally yes, but don’t be surprised if you’re approached by base/local police to ask about your intentions. Ask base PA first.

Q81: Can your wife enlist and have the possibility of being stationed with you?
A81: The Joint Spouse program makes every possible effort to assign spouses to the same base. Learn more here.

Q82: What score do you need to receive on the ASVAB for combat control?
A82: The minimum scores required are Mechanical 55 and General 57. Recommend studying for higher score to be competitive.

Q83: What are the chances of becoming an aerial gunner?
A83: If you qualify and it’s available, then you can list it among the other 4+ jobs you are interested in.

Q84: Can I please join the #stargate program at Cheyenne mountain?
A84: While you can serve as an Airman at Cheyenne Mountain in Colorado, the Stargate Program is fictional.

Q85: Does everybody go through D.E.P after signing or is that optional?
A85: You will swear into the DEP after you process, before entering active duty and going to BMT. It’s mandatory.

Q86: If I wanted to go for loadmaster but got switched to HVAC, will I be able to switch to loadmaster at basic if a position opens up?
A86: No, you will not be able to switch at BMT. Once you sign a contract for your job, that’s the tech school and job you do.

Q87: How can being color blind affect my eligibility?
A87: It limits the jobs you are eligible to perform.

Q88: I’m going in 20 Aug as open mechanical how good is that?
A88: Good thing about going to BMT in open area is you get to see jobs not even offered at MEPS. Some jobs only offered at BMT!

Q89: I thought TACP was open to women? 13L ALO?
A89: We’re still awaiting policy changes from the Office of the Secretary of Defense. Check updates here.

Q90: Do I have a better chance of becoming a pilot if I already have my license to fly prior to joining?
A90: A private pilot’s license will increase your chances; along w/meeting reqs to apply for OTS & pilot training.

Q91: Can we switch bases?
A91: When you arrive at your first base, go to MPF and talk to the assignment people about your options for your next assignment.

Q92: Is pilot training in the Air Force different from that of the Navy’s or Army’s such as time flown in pre flight?
A92: Each branch has different qualifications. You would need to ask the Navy and the Army what their requirements are.

AFRS participates in first tweetchat

Carissa PictureThe Air Force Recruiting Service participated in its  first tweetchat June 6 and received more than 100 recruitment questions from online participants. During the hour-long Web event, AFRS officials answered questions about enlistment eligibility requirements, Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery test scores and other career field-specific questions. The first 15 questions were answered during the tweetchat and are available here. The rest of the unanswered questions are below. AFRS will host monthly tweetchats showcasing Airmen from different career fields who will share their Air Force experiences.  

PHOTO: Carissa, Air Force Recruiting Service online advisor

Q16: Can I still try out for Pararescue even though I wear glasses?
A16: Yes, but you must meet all physical and ASVAB requirements and the physical ability and stamina test (PAST). Vision requirements for Pararescue include passing a color vision test, having uncorrected vision 20/70-20/200, corrected vision or 20/20 vision each eye.

Q17: Could I join the Air Guard on top of ROTC if I don’t get a four-year scholarship and then transfer to active duty upon commission?
A17: For Air Guard information, you may contact the Air National Guard on their website. They have a live chat capability to answer your questions: http://www.goang.com.

Q18: Can you join with type 2 diabetes?
A18: Unfortunately, this is a potentially medically disqualifying condition. However, the doctor at the Military Entrance Processing Station  (MEPS) will make that determination. Your local recruiter can have your medical records for this condition prescreened by the doctor at the MEPS for you to find a preliminary ruling in your particular situation.

Q19: In regards to the Health Professions Scholarship Program, do Air Force physicians choose their specialty or does the Air Force assign a specialty based off of their need?
A19: Physicians can list three specialties and the specialty may be determined by the needs of the Air Force. You can find all of our health profession job descriptions here: http://www.airforce.com/careers/#education:healthcare-professional.

Q20: Will a professional pilot’s degree with a commercial rating and several hundred flight hours give me a leg up for a pilot’s slot?
A20: Here are the general requirements to be a pilot:

  • Be a U.S. citizen
  • 4-year college degree
  • At least a 2.5 GPA
  • Must meet the selection board before age 28
  • Between 5’4″ and 6’5″ in height
  • Distance vision no worse than 20/70, correctable to 20/20
  • Near vision 20/20, uncorrected.

There are many possible paths you can take in pursuit of earning your wings. You could choose to get your degree on your own and apply for your commission following graduation. Or, you could choose to come on to active duty and let the Air Force pay up to 100 percent of your college tuition.You could gain valuable Air Force experience while getting your degree. Once you have obtained your degree, apply for your commission and select to become a pilot. Having earned your private pilot’s license will increase your chances of being selected, as well as earning a technical college degree, though you may apply with most any type of degree.

Q21: Is it likely for a girl to be able to go to Airborne School?
A21: Airborne is an Army Military Occupational Skill (MOS). The Army runs the Airborne School and the Air Force does not have this job. However, Battlefield
Airmen (males only) attend Airborne School. There has been no official Office of the Secretary of Defense (OSD) announcement of any change in policy to allow women in combat positions. As soon as we learn more details, we will provide them.

Q22: I will be graduating my junior college with around 62 credits. Will that help out at all when trying to enlist?
A22: Advanced rank can be earned through many different channels for your accomplishments before entering the Air Force.
College Credits (Qualifying):
– 20 semester or 30 quarter hours = E-2
– 45 semester or 67 quarter hours = E-3
You will need to provide official college transcripts to verify the amount of college credits you have earned.

Q23: What is the best way to become a helicopter pilot in the Air Force?
A23: Here are the general requirements to be a pilot:

  • Be a U.S. citizen
  • 4-year college degree
  • At least a 2.5 GPA
  • Must meet the selection board before age 28
  • Between 5’4″ and 6’5″ in height
  • Distance vision no worse than 20/70, correctable to 20/20
  • Near vision 20/20, uncorrected.

There are many possible paths you can take in pursuit of earning your wings. You could choose to get your degree on your own and apply for your commission following graduation. Or, you could choose to come on to active duty and let the Air Force pay up to 100 percent of your college tuition.You could gain valuable Air Force experience while getting your degree. Once you have obtained your degree, apply for your commission and select to become a pilot. Having earned your private pilot’s license will increase your chances of being selected, as well as earning a technical college degree, though you may apply with most any type of degree.

Q24: How long would it take an enlisted airman to work up to an officer after their BMT and starting tech school?
A24: If you are active duty United States Air Force and inquiring about a commission, applying to Officers Training School, your point of contact is your Base Education Office. The Base Education Office is responsible for the application process and will answer any inquiries pertaining to this process. If you are not active Air Force, the length it may take you to earn your college degree depends on how motivated you are toward earning your degree in your off duty time.

Q25: I’m interested in security forces. What are the qualifications? Requirements?
A25: You must meet the requirements to enlist in the US Air Force, to include qualifying on the Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery (ASVAB), and passing a physical examination. You must have a minimum of a 33 in the General Aptitude Area of your ASVAB test. It is mandatory that you have a valid driver’s license.

Q26: What’s the best way to get in touch with someone to talk about OTS if there aren’t any offices nearby?
A26: You will need to contact your nearest active duty Air Force recruiter and ask to speak to an officer accessions recruiter. http://www.airforce.com/contact-us/recruiter-locator. Or you can visit the OTS website. http://www.au.af.mil/au/holmcenter/OTS/index.asp.

Q27: I was DQ’ed for asthma a few months back. Is there any chance of being able to reapply? Do the MEPS stations ever drop files?
A27: Asthma, including reactive airway disease, exercise-induced bronchospasm or asthmatic bronchitis, reliably diagnosed at any age, is disqualifying. However, you are disqualified after your 13th birthday if any evidence of it still exists. The doctor at the Military Entrance Processing Station (MEPS) will make the determination of whether or not your situation is disqualifying. Your local recruiter can have your medical records for this condition prescreened by the doctor at MEPS for you to find a preliminary ruling. Yes, the MEPS does drop/delete files.

Q28: With fewer slots available today, what are the minimum requirements for enlisting?
A28: To quality for the Air Force, you must:

  • Be a U.S. citizen or have a valid unrestricted alien registration card from the USCIS with at least two years remaining until expiration. (You must obtain this status on your own, the Air Force cannot assist you with obtaining it.)
  • You cannot be a conscientious objector. A conscientious objector is an individual who has claimed the right to refuse to perform military service on the grounds of freedom of thought, conscience, or religion.
  • Any law violations will need to be evaluated.
  • Any use of illegal drugs or misuse of prescription medication will need to be evaluated.
  • You will have a credit check run looking for delinquencies and overbalanced credit.
  • Be between the ages of 17-27. If 17 you will need parental consent.
  • Be of good health all medical issues will need to be evaluated. Meet our height and weight requirements.
  • To enlist, be a high school graduate, junior or senior.
  • To be an officer, be a college graduate or a senior.
  • The Air Force allows you to be single with no dependents, married to a military member with no dependents, or married to a civilian with one dependent upon entry to enlistment.
  • You will need to have a Social Security Card.

Q29: What jobs are typically in demand right now?
A29: The job you train and serve in is dependent upon your successful qualifying in the United States Air Force. Jobs in demand are ever-changing, and are based upon the needs of the Air Force.

Q30: I went Palace Chase a few years ago. I was in four years. Can I go back AD after I graduate from dental hygiene school as a 4yh?
A30: You must meet the requirements for the Air Force Prior Service Program. If you have been out of the military for six years or longer, you will not qualify to reenter the US Air Force. Prior Service vacancies are based upon the Air Force Special Code (AFSC), and the total number of years you have served in that particular job. Jobs are based upon your successful qualifying to reenter the Air Force, and the needs of the Air Force.

Q31: After attending the Academy, what continued medical educational opportunities you offer?
A31: Those individuals who are graduating from the Air Force Academy and are continuing education or pursuing higher education in the Health Professions area, may apply for the Air Force’s Health Professions Scholarship Program (HPSP), or depending upon the type of degree, may apply through the Air Force Institute of Technology (AFIT).

Q32: What are the height and weight requirements to be a pilot?
A32: Height requirements for pilots:
– Standing must be between 64 and 77 inches
– Sitting must be between 33 and 40 inches

Q33: Do Airmen receive vacation time?
A33: Active Duty Air Force members earn 2.5 days per month or 30 days of vacation each year.

Q34: If you get injured in Basic Military Training, what happens?
A34: If you become injured while in Basic Military Training, you will be referred to a doctor(s) who will make a medical eligibility determination to continue training or separate, depending upon the severity of the injury.

Q35: Can you join the Air Force with a peanut allergy? Can you be a pilot?
A35: Peanut allergies are medically disqualifying, and would not be eligible to pursue Pilot Training.

Q36: What heart conditions, confirmed or suspected, exclude someone from joining the Air Force?
A36: Unfortunately, heart conditions are a potentially medically disqualifying condition. However, the doctor at the Military Entrance Processing Station (MEPS) will make that determination. Your local recruiter can have your medical records for this condition prescreened by the doctor at the MEPS for you to find a preliminary ruling in your particular situation.

Q37: How much physical preparation is needed before MEPS?
A37: There is no preparation to take the Air Force entrance physical examination.

Q38: What jobs are open to a Security Forces Specialist after time in the Air Force? What educational degrees are helpful?
A38: Individuals who have been trained in Security Forces in the Air Force, most always qualify as a Peace Officer, Law Enforcement in the civilian sector. With a degree earned while serving in the Air Force, you may qualify to apply for most all federal law enforcement jobs. A degree(s) earned in Criminal Justice is helpful.

Q39: What are the steps needed to become a fighter pilot? What are the requirements?
A39: Here’s what it takes to become an Air Force Pilot:

  • U.S. citizen
  • Any four-year college degree
  • Must meet the selection board before age 28
  • Be between 64 and 77 inches in height
  • Distance vision no worse than 20/70, correctable to 20/20
  • Near vision 20/20, uncorrected, color vision is required.

Path to a Pilot seat:
Once you are qualified to join the Air Force as a commissioned officer you will take this path to get your wings.
1.) Complete Officer Training ( AF Academy, AF ROTC, OTS)
2.) Enter Undergraduate Pilot Training (UPT) and begin your flight training. (one year)
3.) Nearing completion of UPT you will be assigned an aircraft. It’s called getting your Seat Assignment. This is determined by these factors: class ranking, training performance reports, instructor recommendations, your aircraft preferences, and our needs.
4.) Upon completion of UPT and your seat assignment, you continue your flight training for the specific aircraft you were assigned. (six months to one year)
5.) Nearing completion of your Advanced Flight Training, you will be given a squadron and location assignment. Your location preferences are considered.
6.) The commitment for an Air Force pilot is 10 years of active duty service after completion of pilot training.

This website offers excellent information regarding pilot testing, selection, training and lifestyle: http://www.baseops.net/militarypilot.

Q40: As a CSO, can you choose a specific aircraft?
A40: The type of aircraft a Combat System Officer is rated in is determined by academic achievement(s), commander/supervisor recommendation, and the needs of the Air Force.

Q41: Can I enter the Air Force with increased rank if I am in Civil Air Patrol?
A41: Yes, if you have earned the Billy Mitchell, Amelia Earhart or Carl Spaatz award, you may qualify with advanced rank of E-3.

Q42: I am a junior in college, should I wait until I graduate to join the AF? Should I enlist and try to become an officer later?
A42: The decision and time to join the U.S. Air Force is yours to make. If you are a junior in college and progressing toward a Bachelor’s Degree, once you have earned it, it may qualify you to apply for Officers Training School. Should you decide to quit college and complete your education while enlisted and serving in the Air Force, college credits you have earned may qualify you for advanced rank up to E-3. Your Air Force recruiter will discuss qualifying, options, and opportunities with you.

Q43: What is it like to be a Pararescue Jumper?
A43: Are you willing to do whatever it takes to save a person’s life? To parachute, scuba dive, rock climb or even snowmobile into hostile territory to get to a wounded Airman who needs your help? Then you may be ready to be a Pararescue specialist. You’ll be trained in emergency medical tactics, as well as in combat and survival skills so you can go anywhere necessary. You’ll train extensively and be on alert 24 hours a day, because when the call comes, it will be up to you to answer it.

Q44: What are the standard ASVAB requisites and training for Security Operations Specialists?
A44: The score required for Security Forces is General 33; based on Air Force requirements, the minimum Armed Forces Qualifications Test (AFQT) score required for entry on the Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery (ASVAB) is 36. However, due to the high number of individuals who are qualified and waiting to depart for Basic Military Training (over 90 percent of them possessing an ASVAB score over 50 percentile) your recruiter may not be able to process you and may ask you to return when they have space on their waiting list to add new applicants. So study hard and good luck!

Q45: Does it matter what field of study your bachelor’s degree is in for OTS?
A45: No, it does not. You may apply for OTS with most any type of college degree. To be eligible to apply for Officer Training School, one must have a baccalaureate degree or be a senior at a college or university that is accredited by one of the six regional accreditation commissions recognized by the U.S. Dept. of Education. Applicants who have graduated from a non- accredited college or university in the United States or from another country may apply. However, they must present evidence from an accredited institution of higher learning that their credits are acceptable for graduate work. You must have earned a GPA of 3.0 or better to be eligible to apply.

Q46: What is the probability of a female becoming a top-ranked sniper?
A46: It is possible as females are a part of Security Forces. You could apply after two years as a Security Forces member to be a part of the close precision engagement (sniper) team.

Q47: I was medically separated in March. Do I need to wait six months to reenlist or can I do it sooner?
A47: Yes you must wait six months before reapplying to join the Air Force. Make sure you keep all of your paperwork, and the reason for being medically separated no longer exists.

Q48: What is the outlook for flight training candidates needed in the next few years?
A48: The Air Force accepts applications for Officer Training School (OTS), and pilot training from highly qualified applicants for scheduled selection boards throughout the year. Selection boards meet to select candidates, based on the needs of the Air Force.

Q49: How big a demand is there for accounting and business majors in the AF?
A49: The OTS selection board selects the best qualified applicants to become Air Force officers. A board of senior Air Force officers at Headquarters Air Force Recruiting Service will review your application. Selection is competitive and based on your desires, qualifications (such as aeronautical ratings, type of bachelors or master’s degree, or civilian or military specialty skills), and specific Air Force manpower needs. Each applicant is evaluated for character, academic accomplishments, community service, and leadership potential. As part of the selection process, board members review both objective and subjective factors. Objectively, the board considers each applicants academic discipline, and AFOQT scores. Subjectively, board members evaluated work experience, accomplishments, adaptability, character, leadership ability, potential for future growth, and other recommendations. For active duty enlisted members, performance reports and commanders recommendations are also evaluated. A minimum of three Air Force colonels reviews every application. The selection process is similar to an Air Force Officer Promotion Board. Key to the entire process is that no single factor leads to an individual’s selection. Boards meet to select candidates, based on the needs of the Air Force.

Q50: I want to go in as an officer in International Affairs? What is your best advice for jobs associated in that specialty?
A50: There isn’t an International Affairs career field, but Public Affairs officer would be close. Here is a link of our officer careers: http://www.airforce.com/careers/#education:college-graduate

Q51: Are actual manned aircraft being replaced by unmanned drones in the near future? Do we use drones for anything other than military missions?
A51: There is the possibility of unmanned aircraft in the future. Drones can be used for many different purposes like visual check of an area after a natural disaster and patrolling U.S. borders. The use of drones or Remotely Piloted Aircraft contribute to our aircraft inventory and successful mission accomplishments

Q52: Can you go to airborne school if you are Air Force Reserve?
A52: Airborne is an Army Military Occupational Skill (MOS), and training is provided by the U.S. Army. You may contact the Air Force Reserve, a Reserve component of the U.S. Air Force, on their website. The Air Force Reserve has a Live Chat to answer your questions. http://www.afreserve.com

Q53: Is it difficult to get into the ROTC program?
A53: Air Force ROTC is a highly competitive program that leads to commissioning as an officer in the U.S. Air Force following graduation from college. For further assistance, you may contact Air Force ROTC on their website for more information. http://www.afrotc.com

Q54: Does the AF Reserve offer TACP as a career field?
A54: Yes, the Air Force Reserve offer Tactical Air Command and Control as a career selection provided you meet the requirements. You may contact the Air Force Reserve, a Reserve component of the U.S. Air Force, on their website. The Air Force Reserve has a Live Chat to answer your questions. http://www.afreserve.com

Q55: How difficult is it to switch from AF Reserve to active duty?
A55: It will depend upon your qualifications and what jobs the active duty Air Force is looking for. You would fall under the Prior Service program. The Prior Service (PS) program is an enlistment program allowing a select number of separated individuals to return to active duty. The program will access a total of 250 applicants during FY13. The total accession is subject to change based on Air Force needs and is separated into three categories: Category I – Direct Duty (DD): return without consideration of years of service (YOS) and Category II – DD: YOS restriction. Category III – Retraining. Your Air Force Recruiter has a listing of jobs which we are currently looking for, based on the job you are qualified in, years of service, and your successful qualifying. Applicant must not have a break in service exceeding six years. Applicant must have performed duties in the requested return AFSC during their last term of enlistment. An Air Force Recruiter will determine if an eligibility determination is required, to permit you to enlist. Please contact a recruiter nearest you for details. The prior service program is open at this time, and positions are filled based upon the needs of the U.S. Air Force. http://www.airforce.com/contact-us/recruiter-locator

Q56: Is loadmaster a high-demand job?
A56: This Air Force no longer offers Loadmaster as a job. This job has been incorporated into the Special Missions Aviation Apprentice (1A931). This job, just as the loadmaster, is a highly demanding, yet rewarding job. Contact your Air Force recruiter to discuss qualifying, options, and opportunities.

Q57: What are the jobs that are in high demand?
A57: Our Special Operation careers are always in high demand as well as cryptologic linguist.

Q58: Are there jobs that include signing bonuses?
A58: Yes, currently they are:

  • A8X1 AIRBORNE LINGUIST $11,000
  • 1N3XX CRYPTO LINGUIST $11,000
  • 1C2X1 COMBAT CONTROLLERS $15,000
  • 1T2X1 PARARESCUE – $15,000
  • 1C4X1 TACP – $14,000
  • 1T0X1 SERE – $13,000
  • 3E8X1 EOD – $13,000
  • 3P0X1 SECURITY FORCES – $1,500
  • 1W0X2 SPEC. OPS. WEATHER – $13,000

Keep in mind that these bonuses can change based on the needs of the Air Force.

Q59: What is the process to becoming a Special Operations TACP?
A59: You will schedule an appointment with a recruiter and start the process of ASVAB testing and completing a medical exam. Your ASVAB and your medical exam determine your job qualifications. After you have completed processing, you will then be schedule by your recruiter to take the TACP Physical Ability Stamina Test (PAST) to see if you can qualify for that career.

Q60: Does the AF Reserve offer engineering jobs?
A60: Yes, the U.S. Air Force Reserve offers engineering jobs. You may contact the Air Force Reserve, a Reserve component of the U.S. Air Force, on their website. The Air Force Reserve has a Live Chat to answer your questions at http://www.afreserve.com

Q61: Can graduates with degrees in English Literature join as officers, or do you need a science/math-related degree?
A61: Yes you may apply for Officers Training School (OTS) with most any type of college degree. To be eligible to apply for Officer Training School, one must have a baccalaureate degree or be a senior at a college or university that is accredited by one of the 6 regional accreditation commissions recognized by the US Dept. of Education. Applicants who have graduated from a non- accredited college or university in the United States or from another country may apply. However, they must present evidence from an accredited institution of higher learning that their credits are acceptable for graduate work. You must have earned a GPA of 3.0 or better to be eligible to apply.

Q62: Does the AF still offer tuition assistance?
A62: Yes we do still offer the tuition assistance program. Tuition Assistance is a program that the Air Force uses to pay 100% of the tuition cost for college classes that you take in your off-duty time. This is not a loan, and is at no cost to the Air Force member. Using the tuition assistance program will not have any effect on the availability of the Post 9-11 GI Bill funds.

Q63: Does previous flight experience give you a better chance at becoming a pilot?
A63: Along with meeting requirements to apply for Officers Training School (OTS), and pilot training, earning a technical degree and a private pilot’s license will increase your chances of being selected.