Tag Archives: twitter

@AstroTerry’s best tweets from #space

By Staff Sgt. Antonio Gonzalez
Air Force Public Affairs Agency

Did you know our astronaut in space, Air Force Col. Terry Virts, has a Twitter account? If you’re not following him yet, don’t fret because we’ve compiled some of our favorite tweets from him while aboard the International Space Station.

1) An Air Force sunset

Continue reading @AstroTerry’s best tweets from #space

March 18 Tweetchat with Secretary of the Air Force Deborah Lee James

By Secretary of the Air Force Public Affairs

Secretary of the Air Force Deborah Lee James conducted her second tweet chat March 18, providing insights on a variety of topics in today’s Air Force including diversity, modernization, force management and more. In case you couldn’t participate, here’s a summary of what was covered.

Continue reading March 18 Tweetchat with Secretary of the Air Force Deborah Lee James

May 8 recruitment tweet chat

By the Air Force Public Affairs Agency

The Air Force Recruiting Service participated in its ninth “office hours” tweet chat, #AsktheAF on @usairforce, May 8 and received 32 recruitment questions from Twitter followers. During the hour-long Web event, AFRS officials and the Air Force Social Media Team answered questions about enlistment eligibility requirements, Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery test scores and other career field-specific questions. In case you missed it, here are all the questions and answers from the chat.

AF recruiting

Q1: Can I get a tattoo sleeve while in the Air Force?
A1: The tattoo policy applies to getting in and while you’re in. Check out http://bit.ly/111YFdA for more info.

Q2: How closely will the USAF and RCAF be able to work in the future, with both countries flying F-35s?
A2: Unfortunately, we cannot predict future joint missions.

Q3: What’s going to happen to the A-10s?
A3: You’ll have to stay posted for more information.

Q4: What are the current honor grad requirements for BMT?
A4: You’ll need to score a 90% or higher on all testable items & be in the top 10% of all graduates.

Q5: What are the current thunderbolt PT requirements?
A5: Males-1.5 mi in 9:30 >; 55 push-ups, 60 sit-ups; 5 pull-ups. Females – 1.5 mi in 12:00>; 32 push-ups; 55 sit-ups, 2 pull-ups.

Q6: What is the average timeframe for someone in the DEP to go to basic training?
A6: There’s a 3-9 month wait time after you process until you go to BMT.

Q7: Is there any way to get a degree while going active duty?
A7: Yes, after completing BMT, tech school and upgrade training, you can take college classes.

Q8. Does the Air Force still use the MAVNI program? If so, what are languages open?
A8: MAVNI is open for French (from African countries). Talk to a recruiter for more info.

Q9: I am green card holder and 30 years old can I enlist the Air Force?
A9: You exceed the age limit, and we do not give age waivers.

Q10: What kind of nursing options are there in the Air Force?
A10: You must have a BSN to be considered, and then you’ll be placed into a specific field based on current needs.

Q11: How many students can go directly into pre-med after they graduate from the Academy?
A11: Contact Academy officials for your answer: http://bit.ly/1obC6iC

Q12: Do we need a certain ASVAB score to be selected for PJ training?
A12: For PJ training, you will need to score AFQT: 50, Gen: 44.

Q13: What are some combat related jobs I can get into after ROTC besides security forces?
A13: You can be a combat rescue officer or special tactics officer. Learn more here: http://1.usa.gov/15E3PMP

Q14: What are the qualifications to become a USAF security forces officer?
A14: Along with being selected, you need a BA, 3.0 GPA, be a U.S. citizen, & more, but OTS boards are currently suspended.

Q15: Are you allowed to make phone calls at BMT?
A15: Phone calls can be made upon arrival, at week 4 and week 7. Other than that, it’s up to your TI.

Q16: I’m from Ghana and want to know how I can apply to enter the Air Force.
A16: You must live in the U.S. for two years, have a valid visa and meet all other requirements.

Q17: What year will the F-35 enter full production?
A17: The F-35 has already been produced as a joint aircraft.

Q18. What is the TACP PAST test? Standard and SOF if possible.
A18: Please refer to the following link: http://1.usa.gov/15E3PMP

Q19: How many times do you have to pass the PAST test before going to basic and your tech school?
A19: Your recruiter will brief you on their standards.

Q20: Is a high school diploma necessary to join the Air Force or will a GED suffice?
A20: If you got your GED through an in-class program, you can enter. If you tested for it you must also have 15 college credits.

Q21: Is there any chance that the A-10 fleet will remain in active service?
A21: The A-10 remains a viable weapon system. No firm determination has been made on the future of this aircraft.

Q22: What type of jobs will crypto linguists be doing in the Air Force?
A22: You will be proficient in transcribing, recording, and analyzing voice communication signals/transcripts

Q23: Can siblings enlist at the same time?
A23: Provided both siblings are qualified, they may enlist at the same time.

Q24: I am a legal resident and 30 years old, I took the ASVAB and had a 77 on the AFQT. Can I enlist in the Air Force?
A24: Non-prior service applicants must be at least 17 to apply and in Basic Military Training before their 28th birthday.

Q25: Is the Air Force prior service program open to all military branches?
A25: Yes, it’s open to all military branches when it is active provided you’re otherwise qualified. At this time, Prior Service program is suspended with exception of pararescue.

Q26: With the rise of FBW, CPUs and unmanned crafts, how does USAF ensure stick-and-rudder skills are still being learned?
A26: Basic flying skills are taught, and based upon the type of aircraft you will rate, will depend upon the system(s) you will learn.

Q27: Is tactical aircraft maintenance a good job?
A27: If you have displayed the aptitude, it is an extremely good job.

Q28: Are microdermal piercings allowed in the Air Force if they are not visible with clothes on?
A28: Check out the FAQ about tattoos and piercings here: http://bit.ly/15KYpPs.

Q29: What are the requirements of ARC Airmen while on MPA orders to their ARC unit?
A29: This chat is for active duty AF. You will need to contact your Reserve unit for that info.

Q30: Can community college grads w/associates degrees become a commissioned officer?
A30: Must have Bachelors from an accredited university and qualifying GPA to apply for OTS.

Mrs. Welsh, Mrs. Roy chat about Air Force family, departure

By Othana Montoya
Air Force Public Affairs Agency

We held a tweet chat Tuesday with Mrs. Betty Welsh, wife of the Chief of Staff of the Air Force, Gen. Mark A. Welsh III, and Mrs. Paula Roy, wife of the former Chief Master Sergeant of the Air Force, James A. Roy, to answer questions about the Air Force family and Mrs. Roy’s departure. If you didn’t have a chance to watch the tweet chat, we have the discussion for you here.

Question: What are your goals for the Air Force family this year?
Answer: Mrs. Welsh: My goals are that we take care of them in this time of uncertainty and that we keep our families informed and at the forefront of any decisions that may affect them.

Question: What do you think are the greatest challenges awaiting the AF family for 2013?
Answer: Mrs. Welsh: Clearly understanding what is and is not happening in the budget environment and how it will affect our families. The majority of these cuts will not affect them immediately and the long term impact is difficult to access. Allowing us to examine those impacts and explain them to the families will be important. Keeping them informed and asking them to be patient so we can get them the information they need to be informed.

Mrs. Welsh and Mrs. Roy

Question: What is your opinion on the current job/education availability for AF spouses?  Do you see any big changes coming to these programs?
Answer: Mrs. Welsh: In 2012, the Military Spouse Employment Partnership and Hiring Our Heroes held 15 hiring fairs. Over 6,000 spouses have attended, reaping the benefit of over 30 different career workshops and presentations held by our government and nonprofit Alliance partners. 500 spouses have been hired.

Question: As your time as the CMSAF’s wife comes to a close, what was your greatest accomplishment & what are you most proud of?
Answer: Mrs. Roy: We have really worked hard to focus on families, key spouse, spouse courses, trips/visits, etc. The importance of a military member’s family is something I feel we cannot emphasize enough. Families provide the critical support needed to get the mission done. We probably have a way to go with this, but we definitely tried to put a great deal of focus on this.

Question: What words of wisdom do you wish to leave with our Airmen and families?
Answer: Mrs. Roy: You are amazing, and we are incredibly proud of you. We are in awe of what you accomplish every day. Our time serving as CMSAF has been a tremendous blessing for our whole family and something we will never forget. Continue to do great things because tomorrow’s Air Force will need your dedication and innovation more than ever.

Question: Did you see the female secret service agents protecting our President yesterday? Isn’t that wonderful?
Answer: Mrs. Welsh and Mrs. Roy: We agree it is awesome to see women working in the protective service of the President. They all did an amazing job yesterday!

Question: What are the best/worst parts about your husbands working in such important and public positions?
Answer: Mrs. Welsh and Mrs. Roy: The best part is being with the Airmen and their families. To me there was no worst part. The opportunity is so amazing that it makes up for the long hours and hardships.

Question: Have you started CrossFit yet? We discussed it while visiting RAF Mildenhall.
Answer: Mrs. Welsh: I have not tried CrossFit, but I sent my daughter and she loves it. I’ve decided to stick with yoga and running.

Question: What do you think of the USMC requiring admittance of partners of gay service members at spouse clubs?
Answer: Mrs. Welsh: I would hope when we are talking about any club that supports our military spouses, they would be more inclusive than exclusive. Our Airmen and families deserve all the support we can give them.

Question: The Key Spouse program is a wonderful concept but needs some work AF wide, do you have any suggestions?
Answer: Mrs. Welsh: It’s been an honor and a privilege to champion this program for the last 3.5 yrs. We hope as we continue to work this program that we will meet the needs across the AF of all AF families.

Question:  Does the Air Force put a strain on your relationships or at all put your family on hold?
Answer:  Mrs. Welsh and Mrs. Roy: Yes, like every job does, but we try & focus on the wonderful opportunities meeting people & the exposure to different cultures. You can’t put your family on hold, you have to take care of the family & our AF responsibilities. It’s a constant balance.

Question: If you had to fill out a dream sheet of bases where you wanted to be stationed, what would be your top 5?
Answer: Mrs. Roy: I’ve had the opportunity to spend a lot of time in the Pacific theater… Although I’ve visited Europe, I’ve never lived there, so that is where I’d like to be stationed.
Mrs. Welsh: Anywhere in Texas, we had the opportunity to have a short tour there & loved being so close to family.

Question: How long have your husbands served?
Answer: CMSAF Roy 30.5 years and Gen. Welsh 36.5 years.

Question: What advice would you give to young Airmen with just over a year of service?
Answer: Mrs. Welsh and Mrs. Roy: Be the best Airmen you can, and take advantage of every opportunity you can.  Be the best leader you can.

Question:  What are your goals for the Air Force family this year?
Answer: Mrs. Welsh: My goals are that we take care of them in this time of uncertainty & we keep our families informed and at the forefront of any decisions that may affect them.

Question: What does it mean to you to be a leader?
Answer: Mrs. Welsh and Mrs. Roy: Our AF core values are a wonderful place to start. Integrity, service and excellence.

Question: What are you most looking forward to during your husband’s retirement? What’s next for your family?
Answer: Mrs. Roy: I want to continue to serve Airmen & their families as much as I can.  I will be joining the AFA team as their director of Airman & Family programs.  I look forward to continuing to support the great men & women who serve in our AF & their families.

Question: What advice would you give to a young aspiring woman wanting to join the Airmen?
Answer: Work hard in school and ensure you are mentally and physically ready to join the best team you could ever be a part of.

Closing: Mrs. Welsh: I want to close by thanking Mrs. Roy for her service & all she’s done for Airmen & their families. She’s truly been a team player & I’m thankful it’s not goodbye b/c she’ll always be in our hearts.

Photo: Mrs. Betty Welsh and Mrs. Paula Roy prepare for a tweet chat January 22, 2013.

Tweet chat: Mrs. Betty Welsh, Nov. 15, 2012

By Staff Sgt. Amanda Dick
Air Force Public Affairs Agency

Recently, Betty Welsh, the Air Force Chief of Staff’s wife, sat down to answer a few questions for an Air Force spouse tweet chat, focusing on the Air Force family.

Question: What’s it like to be the CSAF’s wife?

Answer: Awesome, surreal, stressful, exciting, overwhelming and spectacular.

Question: What do you plan to do to make tomorrow’s Air Force better than today’s?

Answer: Making sure we take care of our Airmen and families and educating them on available programs. I plan to communicate with Airmen and families and develop programs that cater to resiliency and retainment.

Question: I’m in the psychology field dedicated to soldiers suffering from Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder. Have you had to deal with any of that on your end?

Answer: We’ve come a long way in recognizing those suffering from PTSD and Traumatic Brain Injury. The Air Force is working hard on programs to help our wounded warriors deal with these challenging issues.

Question: Mrs. Amos recently came out with a suggested reading list for military families. Is there one for USAF families in the works?

Answer: Yes! The list will be available the first week in December, and many of the items on Mrs. Amos’ list will be applicable to Air Force families.

Question: What are some resources for Air Force spouses with careers?

Answer: White House Joining Forces Initiative and the Military Spouses Employment Program are two resources I would encourage spouses to utilize. The MSEP encourages companies to hire military spouses and is available to all military spouses in all services. For more information, visit MSEP.

Question: Is Tactical Air Control Party a challenging job to get into?

Answer: Yes, TACP is very challenging, both physically and mentally. For more information, contact your local recruiter or visit the Air Force Recruiting Facebook page here.

Question: If somebody told you they were considering the Air Force, what would you recommend to them?

Answer: If somebody told me they were considering joining the Air Force, I would tell them they won’t find a better service to be a part of.

Question: What is the biggest challenge facing Air Force spouses today?

Answer: The biggest challenge I see is managing families and careers with the increased operations tempo of today’s military to include deployments.

Question: With the recent changes to basic military training, will there be more focus on strengthening military training instructor families? More kid friendly marriage retreats?

Answer: There are many recommendations that are coming out of the BMT review, and we are looking at all of them and how to best implement. Our goal is to make a healthy environment for all.

Question: Being a military family, how has social media helped you stay connected with friends and family?

Answer: It’s a great tool and makes it much easier to stay connected with family and friends. With our busy lifestyles, it is very easy to stay connected with many people by simply jumping online.

Question: A lot of off-base fitness centers have free or low cost childcare. Do you think something similar could be implemented on base?

Answer: Yes, it’s something we are very seriously looking at. Where there is space, we have established mother/child fitness rooms; however, because we are not able to build new facilities, we are trying to do the best we can with our current facilities.